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Old 02-25-2010, 10:04 AM
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jriley1349 jriley1349 is offline
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Thumbs up HBO: The Pacific - 10 pt miniseries

A 10 part WW II miniseries, produced by HBO will premiere March 14, 2010.
Similar to Band of Brothers only about US Marine Corps's actions in the Pacific Theater of Operations.

Storyline:
The Pacific is based primarily on two memoirs of U.S. Marines: With the Old Breed by Eugene Sledge and Helmet for My Pillow by Robert Leckie. The series will tell the stories of the two authors and Marine John Basilone, as the war against the Empire of Japan rages.

Given the literary sources mentioned above, the series will feature well-known battles involving the 1st Marine Division, such as Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester, Peleliu, and Okinawa, as well as Basilone's involvement in the Battle of Iwo Jima.
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Old 02-25-2010, 10:56 AM
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Thanks for the heads up. Will be watching for sure.
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Old 02-26-2010, 04:03 AM
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If its as good as Band of Brothers, I'll be glued to the tube.
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:16 PM
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I am glad the series was made, just which the episodes were longer and covered the chronologic activities of more then one branch of service and men envovled. There was alot more that could have been told-I have enjoyed the series-but 60 plus years is a long time to wait to document WWII.
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Old 04-16-2010, 07:08 AM
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I have really enjoyed this series. My father served with Co. A, 172nd ( RCT ) Infantry, 43rd Infantry Division on Gaudalcanal, and Rendova / New Georgia, and Arundel island. He was also on the USS Coolidge that sunk ( Oct. 26, 1942 ) when it hit American mines ( they were laid the day before ) at Espiritu Santo Island, New Hebridies groups (now Vanuatu). ( It is now one of the top 10 diving locations in the world ). It gives me some idea of what is unit faced while fighting there, even though he was not in the Marines.

I was just reading the wiki entry for John Basilone at :


John_Basilone John_Basilone
John Basilone (November 4, 1916 February 19, 1945) was a United States Marine Gunnery Sergeant who received the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Guadalcanal during World War II. He was the only enlisted Marine in World War II to receive the Medal of Honor and the Navy Cross.
He served three years in the United States Army with duty in the Philippines before joining the Marine Corps. In 1940, he joined the Marine Corps and after attending training was sent to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the Solomon Islands and eventually to Guadalcanal where he held off 3,000 Japanese troops after his 15-member unit was reduced to two men. He was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Iwo Jima, after which he was posthumously honored with the Navy Cross. He has received many honors including being the namesake for streets, military locations and a United States Navy destroyer.


While on Guadalcanal his fellow Marines gave him the nickname "Manila John" due to his former service in the Philippines.[3] On the night of October 2425, 1942 his unit engaged the Japanese in the Lunga area when their position came under attack by a regiment of approximately 3,000 soldiers. The Japanese forces began a frontal attack using machine-guns, grenades and mortars against the American heavy machine-guns. Basilone commanded two sections of machineguns that fought for the next 48 hours until only Basilone and two other men were still able to continue fighting. Basilone moved an extra gun into position and maintained continual fire against the incoming Japanese forces. He repaired another machine-gun and personally manned it, holding the defensive line until replacements arrived. With the continuous fighting, ammunition became critically low and supply lines were cut off. Basilone fought through hostile lines and returned with urgently needed ammunition for his gunners. By the end of the battle, the Japanese regiment was virtually annihilated. For his actions during this battle he received the United States military's highest award for bravery, the Medal of Honor.[4]
Afterwards Private First Class Nash W. Phillips, of Fayetteville, North Carolina, recalled from the battle for Guadalcanal: "Basilone had a machine gun on the go for three days and nights without sleep, rest or food. He was in a good emplacement, and causing the Japanese lots of trouble, not only firing his machine gun but also using his pistol."[3]

After his request to return to the fleet was approved, he was assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division during the invasion of Iwo Jima. On February 19, 1945 he was serving as a machine-gun section leader in action against Japanese forces on Red Beach II. During the battle, the Japanese concentrated their fire at the incoming Americans from heavily fortified blockhouses staged throughout the island. With his unit pinned down, Basilone made his way around the side of the Japanese positions until he was directly on top of the blockhouse. He then attacked with grenades and demolitions, single handedly destroying the entire strongpoint and its defending garrison. He then fought his way toward Airfield Number 1 and aided an American tank that was trapped in an enemy mine field under intense mortar and artillery barrages. He guided the heavy vehicle over the hazardous terrain to safety, despite heavy weapons fire from the Japanese. As he moved along the edge of the airfield, an exploding mortar shell instantly killed him. For his actions during the battle of Iwo Jima, he was posthumously approved for the Marine Corps' second highest decoration for bravery, the Navy Cross.[7]
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Old 04-30-2010, 03:16 AM
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Real photos of the Pacific Theater: http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured...cent-theaters/
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