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Old 06-09-2003, 08:12 AM
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Gimpy Gimpy is offline
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Default Do you think POW's deserve "monthly Compensation"

even IF they have NO apparent "disabilty" asscociated with their capture and internment??

Check this out.
*************************************
VETERANS RESOURCES NETWORK

Dear Readers,

According to the VFW magazine, page 10, June/July 2003 edition, the
Congress is considering compensating former U.S. Prisoners of War
(POW's). If you were held for 30-120 days you would rate a $150.00
per month check, and 121-540 days a $300.00 check. The Bill was
introduced by Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho).

It seems a bit odd to compensate people for surrendering. The Code
of conduct for U.S. Military personal is copied below and states
resistance is primary. Capture is always a possibility, and those
who serve as POW's deserve thanks, but not a monthly paycheck.

While it is commendable for POW's to be recognized by the POW medal,
and receive compensation for disability associated with their
captivity, it would undermine the will to fight if Military persons
were paid simply for surrendering.

Your Editor,
Ray B Davis, Jr.

(NOTE: below the code of conduct, and below that the Bill H.R. 850)

##### START #####

10631 Code of Conduct for Members of the Armed Forces of the
United States
Signed: August 17, 1955
Federal Register page and date: 20 FR 6057, August 20, 1955
Amended by: EO 11382, November 28, 1967; EO 12017,
November 3, 1977

---------------------------------------------------------------------
---------

Executive Order 10631--Code of Conduct for members of the Armed
Forces of the United States

Source: The provisions of Executive Order 10631 of Aug. 17,
1955,
appear at 20 FR 6057, 3 CFR, 1954-1958 Comp., p. 266, unless
otherwise noted.

By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the
United States, and as Commander in Chief of the armed forces of
the United States, I hereby prescribe the Code of Conduct for
Members of the Armed Forces of the United States which is
attached to this order and hereby made a part thereof.

All members of the Armed Forces of the United States are
expected
to measure up to the standards embodied in this Code of Conduct
while in combat or in captivity. To ensure achievement of these
standards, members of the armed forces liable to capture shall
be
provided with specific training and instruction designed to
better equip them to counter and withstand all enemy efforts
against them, and shall be fully instructed as to the behavior
and obligations expected of them during combat or captivity.

[Second paragraph amended by EO 12633 of Mar. 28, 1988, 53 FR
10355, 3 CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 561]

The Secretary of Defense (and the Secretary of Transportation
with respect to the Coast Guard except when it is serving as
part
of the Navy) shall take such action as is deemed necessary to
implement this order and to disseminate and make the said Code
known to all members of the armed forces of the United States.

[Third paragraph amended by EO 11382 of Nov. 28, 1967, 32 FR
16247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp., p. 691]

Code of Conduct for Members of the United States Armed Forces

I

I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country
and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their
defense.

[Article I amended by EO 12633 of Mar. 28, 1988, 53 FR 10355, 3
CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 561]

II

I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I
will
never surrender the members of my command while they still have
the means to resist.

[Article II amended by EO 12633 of Mar. 28, 1988, 53 FR 10355, 3
CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 561]

III

If I am captured I will continue to resist by all means
available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to
escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the
enemy.

IV

If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow
prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action
which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will
take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those
appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

V

When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am
required
to give name, rank, service number and date of birth. I will
evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I
will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country
and its allies or harmful to their cause.

[Article V amended by EO 12017 of Nov. 3, 1977, 42 FR 57941, 3
CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 152]

VI

I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom,
responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles
which
made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United
States of America.

[Article VI amended by EO 12633 of Mar. 28, 1988, 53 FR 10355, 3
CFR, 1988 Comp., p. 561]

##### H.R. 850 (portion) #####

Former Prisoners of War Special Compensation Act of 2003 (Introduced
in House)

HR 850 IH

Sec. 1181. Special compensation: former prisoners of war

`(a)(1) The Secretary shall pay monthly to each veteran who is a
former prisoner of war and who while a prisoner of war was detained
or interned for not less than 30 days special compensation at the
rate specified in subsection (b).

`(2) For the purposes of this section, the term `veteran' includes
an individual serving on active duty.

`(b) The rate of special compensation for purposes of this section
shall be as follows:

`(1) If the former prisoner of war was detained or interned for a
period of not more than 120 days, the monthly amount of special
compensation payable shall be $150.

`(2) If the former prisoner of war was detained or interned for a
period of more than 120 days and not more than 540 days, the monthly
amount of special compensation payable shall be $300.

`(3) If the former prisoner of war was detained or interned for a
period of more than 540 days, the monthly amount of special
compensation payable shall be $450.

`(c) If a former prisoner of war was detained or interned on two or
more separate occasions, the cumulative length of all occasions of
confinement or internment as a prisoner of war shall determine the
monthly compensation rate payable under subsection (b).


##### END #####

Signed:
Veterans Resources Network
Ray B Davis Jr, Editor
Box 68
East Flat Rock, NC 28726
http://www.veteransresources.net
***************************************

I don't know about you---but I think this is BULL$HIT!!!

Hell, if they can "afford" to do this---they can give ALL "disabled vets" or their dependents, and/or widows a pretty healthy raise in their disability compensation---HUH?
__________________


Gimpy

"MUD GRUNT/RIVERINE"


"I ain't no fortunate son"--CCR


"We have shared the incommunicable experience of war..........We have felt - we still feel - the passion of life to its top.........In our youth our hearts were touched with fire"

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
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  #2  
Old 12-21-2009, 01:02 PM
Robersabel Robersabel is offline
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There is no question money talks...

There is another category former POW's have been unjustly denied recognition: Their combat service. Particularly those participated in the Battle of the Bulge, Bataan, and Corregidor.

Many with a variety of MOS’s picked up their weapons, formed or joined existing infantry units. Many were killed or wounded while serving as infantrymen. In the Philippine Islands, the majority were taken prisoner.

Upon repatriation, a substantial number were processed at stations, and received their awards and decorations. There are two commonly fell by the wayside. The Purple Heart, and Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB).

As recent as 2003, a member of the First Provisional Air Corps Regiment, II Corps that fought in the Battle of Bataan was presented the CIB. As recent as 2008, a former member of the AAF that was wounded (frostbite) during captivity at (ETO) was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart by the Air Force Board for Correction of Military Record.


The USAF took jurisdiction of AAF personnel regarding awards, and decorations in 1948. Exception: Badges i.e. CIB. The Army retains the authority to award the CIB.

Copies of documents reveal hundreds of combat infantrymen without the MOS of an infantryman were awarded the CIB in accordance with guidelines dated during the early 1940’s.

Copies of documents reveal former POWs were awarded the Purple Heart for wounds (frostbite) incurred during captivity.


Yet today, the Army continues to deny the Purple Heart to Army personnel that incurred wounds (frostbite) during captivity. According to guidelines, USAF, and a former JAG Colonel they are eligible.


The Army continues to deny the CIB to former combat infantryman in the class identified above. Their justification refers to guidelines not applicable to veterans of the Philippines.


Where is the justice for their contribution towards the freedom we enjoy today?>>


Robert
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  #3  
Old 12-21-2009, 01:07 PM
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Whale Whale is offline
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Which side???
Is Obama going to pay the Gitmo detainees now?
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Old 12-24-2009, 06:05 PM
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ussfa344 ussfa344 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whale View Post
Which side???
Is Obama going to pay the Gitmo detainees now?
Whale,

Of course he will. It's part of that long standing Illinois tradition of buying votes.

Robert
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Old 12-24-2009, 01:49 PM
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ussfa344 ussfa344 is offline
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I agree with Gimpy, no additional benefits for POWs based solely on the fact that they were POWs. There are already laws on the books to compensate them for any and all residual disabilities from their time in enemy hands. There are a lot of us here on this forum that were outnumbered and chose to fight rather than surrender, and got our butts whipped for it. I don't mean to deminish the service of those held captive by our enemies, but how would you distinguish between those that gave their all and then became POWs in spite of all their efforts, and those that became POWs because they chose surrender over standing their ground? And how do you determine who colaborated with our enemies? The POWs from Viet Namare still closed lips over who colaborated and to what extent.

Nope, let the existing compensation pprogram pay them for their residual issues.

Robert Pryor
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Old 12-24-2009, 05:26 PM
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colmurph colmurph is offline
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Let's forget about all the "Phony" POW's, the 1,300 or so who have put claims into the VA. Let's go ahead and pay $150 a month to the 908 men who were held in the Hanoi Hilton for so many years. Won't be a big deal as about half of them have passed on already. The ones who are still alive----yes! they deserve it!
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Old 12-24-2009, 05:36 PM
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I think that the men who were held in the "Hanoi Hilton" for upwards of 5 years should get this extra compensation. One of them was given the Medal of Honor for his conduct during those trying times. If you don't remember him, he was the VP candidate who was trashed by Gimpy and his ilk. Adm. Stockdale. The rest of the "Phonies" can ho to heck as far as I am concerned. The few from Desert Storm were not held long enough to miss the latest movies.
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Old 12-27-2009, 10:46 PM
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Doc.2/47 Doc.2/47 is offline
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Hmmm...I got a draft notice, wonder if that makes me a POW of the US Army?

I think they ought to retro-actively increase the hazardous duty pay. There is something just plain wrong about being fined more for failing to buckle a seat belt.
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