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Old 04-28-2002, 11:53 AM
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Default not "Insurrection" but "Philipine-American War"

Beau

Registered to :Aug 29, 2001
Messages :163
From :P-Town
Posted 17-03-2002 at 18:54
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Table 1 - Number of American Troops Serving in the Christian War Theater As of 1901

(Luzon, Visayas and Christian Mindanao Provinces)


Category
Officers / Men

Regular Army
1,342
60,933

Volunteers
2,135
47,867

Total
3,477
108,800

Source : From the Adjutant-General's Report issued on December 1901; published in The Philippine Islands by John Foreman, 1906, p. 553
Table 2 - Number of American Troops Serving in Muslim Morolands As of 1904

Category
Officers / Men

Regional
Distribution

Sub-Total
Regular U.S. Troops
236

Malabang
500
3,766

Parang-Parang
205

Jolo
744

Other areas
2,317

Civilian Staff
25

Native Troops
11
543

Philippine Constabulary (Muslims
and Christian mixed) under Civil Government orders

22
530

Total Strength
294
4,839

Source : The Philippine Islands by John Foreman, 1906.

Table 3 - Number of American Casualties Independence War (1899-1902)
Category, As of August 31, 1899*

As of 1901**

July 4, 1902

Officers
Men
Combined

Officers
Men
Combined

Combined
Dead
(all causes)
19
342
361
115
3,384
3,499
3,216
Killed in Action = 1,018

Wounded
87
1,325
1,412
170
2,609
2,779

TOTAL
361

3,499
4,234
Sources:
* Jose, Vivencio R., The Rise and Fall of Antonio Luna, Solar Books, Quezon City, Philippines, 1986, p. 301
** Foreman, John, The Philippine Islands, Scribner Books, NY, 1906)

Table 4 - Filipino War Casualties (1899-1913)
Casualty Category
Luzon/Visayas Christians

Mindanao Muslims
(1902-1913)

1899-1902
1902-1907

Soldiers
20,000 *
2,000 *

Civilians
500,000 *

100,000 **
Notes: * Figures from conflicting estimates from historians. The main casualties came from punitive expeditions in Samar and concentration camps in Batangas, Marinduque, and other provinces.

** PAWCI's estimate based on its own research.

Table 5 - Number of Battle Encounters (1899-1913)
Casualty Category
Christian War Theater

Moro War Theater
(1902-1913)

1899-1902
1902-1907

Major Battles *

Skirmishes **

TOTAL
Over 5,000

Notes:
* Major battles are formal or conventional battles using rifles and artilleries.
** Skirmishes were actually guerilla warfare but this non-formal warfare was not defined then by military science and tactics.

Research still going for data. Carried by the momentum of the war, the 1902-1907 encounters were carried by Filipino guerrillas who refused to surrender.

Table 6 - Assorted Arms Surrendered
by the Filipinos
Type of Armament
Total Count

Christian War Theater

Moro War Theater
(1903-1913)

1899-1902
1902-1907

Revolvers
868

Rifles
15,693

Cannons & Lantakas
122

Bolo knives
3,516

Note: No breakdown of make, models, and manufacturer.
Lantakas are are home-made cannons made of bamboos or water pipes.

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Copyright (c)1998. All rights reserved
Philippine-American War Centennial Initiative (PAWCI)



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Beau

Registered to :Aug 29, 2001
Messages :163
From :P-Town
Posted 20-03-2002 at 17:33
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Although the U.S. Army's promotion of prostitution in the Philippines was widely reported and criticized by anti-imperialist writers, the first "authoritative" (because it came from a source supportive of U.S. rule) account of the abandonment of Filipino women and Amerasian children was published in the United States in August of 1902 when an article from the Christian Advocate of Manila was reprinted by newspapers and weeklies throughout the country. The Christian Advocate reported the scene when the Twenty-fourth Regiment of the U.S. Army was brought to Manila before departing for the United States:

This regiment has been doing garrison duty for several months, and, as has been a too free custom with the American army, many of these soldiers have been consorting with the native women. Many have bound these women by promises of marriage; others have already been legally married, while by far the greater number have been living in concubinage pure and simple. Now comes the order, and the men are being sent home. It is a sad sight to see these women, some with children in their arms, bewailing their abandonment. It is perfectly safe to say there are hundreds of such forsaken women here today, in disgrace among their own people, who at one time thought themselves honored wives. This thing is a lasting shame upon our service, and yet there are commanding officers who have openly favored it because, as they say, tending to better discipline in the army.

When it reprinted this passage, the Boston Herald pointed out that "it is consistent with all that is known about the common conditions of garrison life among a people who are regarded as inferior." It concluded by highlighting the last sentence's indication of official policy. "The soldier is considered to have a necessity and a license that the civilian does not have," the Herald commented, "and it is for his protection that most of the schemes of lawful regulation of prostitution have been devised. An army in a foreign land is a law unto itself in this matter, as in other things."

A year later, the issue became the focus of one of the concluding chapters of Raymond L. Bridgman's anti-imperialist novel, Loyal Traitors (Boston: James H. West Co., 1903). The novel is about three American anti-imperialists who find that protesting the war from Boston is not enough. They decide to go to the Philippines and join the Filipino army, where (anti-imperialist writers not being immune to feelings of racial superiority) they all become officers. In a chapter entitled "Macaria Henderson Pleads in Vain," the experiences of Filipino women and children abandoned by U.S. troops is portrayed. After one soldier requests and is given a discharge from the army to stay in the Philippines with his wife--"the only instance in that company in which any American soldier would remain and care for the woman he married"--the scene moves to Macaria Henderson's plea as witnessed by a Captain Dexter of the U.S. Army:

"Remember the baby, Charles," she pleaded, "even if you care nothing for me. He is yours. Remember that we were lawfully married by the priest and that I was not like a great many other women."

"Oh, fudge!" was his rough answer. "You better go home and mind your baby if you think so much of him. He will grow up just like any of the rest of your niggers. You'll get along all right, somehow or other.... You have made your bed and you have got to lie in it."

Brutally he turned his back upon her, and Senora Charles Henderson, once Senorita Macaria Lingat, took up her baby, her shame, and her widowhood, and went sadly back to her father's house. As she was going slowly out, Captain Dexter's ear caught the words: "When baby is big enough, he will fight the Americans!"

As pointed out by Daniel B. Schirmer elsewhere in this issue, U.S. troops frequently called the Filipinos "niggers". In both Bridgman's novel and the Boston Herald's article, racism and sexual exploitation were linked with imperialism. The antagonism expressed in the last line quoted is what the U.S. government is now being urged to avoid by providing financial assistance for the estimated 50,000 Amerasian children in the Philippines.
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