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Old 01-13-2018, 09:54 AM
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Question Double Standard

1-13-2018

“God Forbid that President Trump should ever pass gas in public, for if this should ever happen - there will be those out there who would also call it an impeachable offense!”

“Get Real People” Once elected, it makes no difference what political party that person belongs to, as we all will sink or swim upon their leadership, or lack of it! And for the record, and in my opinion, those who are doing their damnedest to detract from “This President” are, in effect, “Damaging Our Own Nation” in the process. But apparently they don’t give a damn, as to them the political party (any political party), means far more than our country itself, our reputation, our progress, our kid’s futures, and maybe even our survival as a nation, once again in my opinion!

The enemies of “Our Country”, and there are many, have got to be laughing their butts off over these purely-political attacks, as those who are doing the attacking, are damaging “Our Nation” and it’s future, a helluva lot more than they are any one single individual! “And it is still my opinion that these incessant attacks against Trump are geared merely to grease the path for a former contender to run again?”

“And once again for the record, maybe these countries, and individuals, who hunger to see us fall, should also come to realize that “Should the United States Ever Fail”, who in this world would be left to help to support them?”

Finally – “When The Reds vowed to take us over from within, maybe some of us didn’t realize - just how far within, they really had in mind?”

May “The Almighty” Forever Bless and Preserve “Our United States of America!”

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  #2  
Old 01-13-2018, 12:01 PM
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Exclamation Mr. President you're one sick Puppy!

HC - I have to disagree -

This President is one sick puppy. He's spoiled man with a dirty mouth and is very disrespectful. Sure we needed change - but with someone whose mouth overloads his ass we did't need. He's illiterate his brain is not wired up to hold a position as leader of this country. Elected or not he's gotta go.

He acts like he's a King - we don't have King's we got rid those a long time ago. He's not honest and he's not a leader. You call him President - but of whom? He has stepped over the boundaries of our social and leadership roles required of a President.

He stepped over the line with his racial comments. We Veterans were color blind we fought side by side with many personnel of color and some of us owe our lives to one or more men of color. He's destroyed most of our allies with his racial comments which should have no place in this country.

The original residence of this country were the Indian's look what we did to them. I'm a 3rd generation immigrant my generations fought in WWI - WWII - Korea and me Viet Nam. What more can you ask for!

Mr. President clean up your Act!

Boats
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O Almighty Lord God, who neither slumberest nor sleepest; Protect and assist, we beseech thee, all those who at home or abroad, by land, by sea, or in the air, are serving this country, that they, being armed with thy defence, may be preserved evermore in all perils; and being filled with wisdom and girded with strength, may do their duty to thy honour and glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

"IN GOD WE TRUST"
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Old 01-13-2018, 12:46 PM
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In Trump’s Immigration Remarks, Echoes of a Century-Old Racial Ranking
RE: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/13/u...n-history.html

The argument was genteel, the tone judicious, the meaning plain: America, wrote the senator leading Congress’s push for immigration reform in 1924, was beginning to “smart under the irritation” of immigrants who “speak a foreign language and live a foreign life.”

The year before, things had been slightly less decorous. A certain unnamed country in Europe was “making the United States a dumping ground for its undesirable nationals,” the president of the American Museum of Natural History, Henry Fairfield Osborn, told a national immigration conference.

Here in the earliest weeks of 2018, the worldview that last gained wide acceptance nearly a century ago has found perhaps its most succinct expression yet — distilled, this time, to a pungent question from President Trump: Why should the United States take in immigrants from “shithole countries” in Africa over people from places like Norway?

Mr. Trump, who made the remark while discussing potential immigration legislation with members of Congress at the White House on Thursday, also asked, “Why do we want people from Haiti here?” “Take them out,” he added. (On Friday, Mr. Trump denied that he had used some of the derogatory language, while a senator who attended the meeting confirmed that he had.)

His commentary struck many Republicans as well as Democrats as extreme, if not outright racist. But the words were a Twitter-era detonation of an attitude that once before shaped American immigration policy, an attitude that, even after the country tried to reverse itself by loosening immigration laws in the 1960s, seems to have loitered on in the national attic.

Its resurfacing in the public sphere capsizes a half-century of mainstream consensus: that immigrants enrich the United States, no matter where they come from.

Mr. Trump’s remarks were “sadly reminiscent of the language used by nativists and racists in the early 20th century against Eastern and Southern Europeans and Asians,” said Mae Ngai, an immigration historian at Columbia University.

“Obviously he likes Norwegians because they are white,” she added. “But he knows nothing about Norway, a country with single-payer universal health care and free college education. Why would anyone want to leave Norway for the U.S.?”

The more liberal immigration policies of 1965 still form the scaffolding of the United States’ legal immigration system, ushering in — if unintentionally — an America that grows less white every year. For years now, Asians, Africans and Hispanics have accounted for an expanding proportion of the country’s visas.

But first came 1924, when the people in charge spoke openly of ranking immigrants of certain origins above others.

That was the year Congress passed an immigration overhaul that set strict quotas designed to encourage immigrants from Western Europe, block all but a few from Southern and Eastern Europe and bar altogether those from Asia. Overall immigration levels were slashed. The racial theories at play in the legislation, wrote the immigration historian Roger Daniels, would later become the first draft of “the official ideology of Nazi Germany.”

There were some familiar refrains in the 1924 immigration debate. Cheap immigrant labor had depressed wages, the restrictionists said. Immigrants had seized jobs from Americans, they said. But it was also heavy on racist rhetoric aimed at preserving what eugenicists and social theorists of the time called the “Nordic” race that, in their telling, had originally settled the United States.

The bill’s authors had been avid readers of the 1916 book “The Passing of the Great Race,” in which the eugenicist Madison Grant warned that the country was in danger of a “replacement of a higher type by a lower type here in America unless the native American uses his superior intelligence to protect himself and his children from competition with intrusive peoples drained from the lowest races of Eastern Europe.”

Under the 1924 law, the number of visas given to each country could not exceed annual quotas based on the number of people from that country who were living in the United States as of the 1890 census, before the flow of new Americans had begun to tilt away from Western European countries.

The United States, the law’s supporters said, could now dispense with the “melting pot.” The only new immigrants who would be allowed to come would already look, act and speak like the Americans already here.

“Each year’s immigration should so far as possible be a miniature America, resembling in national origins the persons who are already settled in our country,” the bill’s chief author, Senator David A. Reed of Pennsylvania, wrote in The New York Times on April 27, 1924.

Englishmen and Germans were welcome; Italians and Jews, not so much. No Asians need apply. (Incidentally, Norway, home to many Nordics, was also subject to a quota, though it was given significantly more slots than countries including Greece, Spain, Turkey and Hungary.)

By 1965, Congress had repealed the per-country quotas, replacing them with a system that emphasized new immigrants’ family ties to American citizens and residents and, to a lesser degree, the skills they brought. Under the framework established then, people already admitted to the United States can sponsor their relatives overseas through the process Mr. Trump calls “chain migration.” Others now come for jobs, for study, as refugees or through the diversity visa lottery, a program put in place in 1990 and intended for nationalities that are underrepresented in the normal immigration stream.

Conservative members of Congress, including some Democrats, had fought to include the family-based preferences for relatives of people already living in the country, believing, according to historians, that more white Europeans were likely to come that way.

But fewer Europeans, and far more Latin Americans and Asians, knocked on the door.

In the 2016 fiscal year, according to government statistics, there were about 98,000 people from Europe who became lawful permanent residents. More than four times as many, 443,000, came from Asia, and half a million from North, South and Central America and the Caribbean. Africa sent another 111,000. Over all, nearly 1.2 million people obtained green cards that year, compared with about 700,000 in all the years from 1930 to 1939 combined.

The consequences of the 1965 law were unforeseen by all. They were downright alarming to some.

In an October 2015 radio interview with Stephen K. Bannon, who would become Mr. Trump’s chief strategist, Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama, who would become attorney general, pointed out that the country’s population was heading toward a historically high proportion of foreign-born Americans. Mr. Sessions, a longtime supporter of tighter controls on immigration, helped craft Mr. Trump’s immigration proposals during the 2016 presidential campaign.

“When the numbers reached about this high in 1924, the president and Congress changed the policy, and it slowed down immigration significantly,” Mr. Sessions said. Those who came to the United States through the 1924 quotas assimilated into the country and helped create “really the solid middle class of America,” he continued.

But, he said, “We passed a law that went far beyond what anybody realized in 1965, and we’re on a path now to surge far past what the situation was in 1924.”

Mr. Sessions and Mr. Trump have called repeatedly for ending chain migration and the diversity visa lottery. Haitians, too, have found themselves partially shut out by the Trump administration. In November, homeland security officials announced that they would end a humanitarian program that had given some 59,000 Haitians temporary permission to live and work in the United States since an earthquake shattered their country in 2010.

Living conditions in Haiti, they said, had improved enough that Haiti could “safely receive” its citizens.

Jack Begg contributed research.
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O Almighty Lord God, who neither slumberest nor sleepest; Protect and assist, we beseech thee, all those who at home or abroad, by land, by sea, or in the air, are serving this country, that they, being armed with thy defence, may be preserved evermore in all perils; and being filled with wisdom and girded with strength, may do their duty to thy honour and glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

"IN GOD WE TRUST"
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Old 01-13-2018, 12:53 PM
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African ambassadors condemn Trump remarks as 'racist'
Fredreka Schouten, USA TODAY Published 12:40 p.m. ET Jan. 13, 2018 | Updated 1:24 p.m. ET Jan. 13, 2018
RE: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...st/1031263001/

WASHINGTON — President Trump’s remarks about African countries and Haiti drew condemnation from a group of African ambassadors to the United Nations who called them “outrageous, racist and xenophobic” and demanded a retraction and apology.

Samantha Power, who served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President Obama, shared the ambassadors’ statement on Twitter. “Whoa. I’ve never seen a statement like this by African countries directed at the United States,” she wrote.

The statement, issued late Friday after the African ambassadors held an emergency meeting, comes amid an international outcry over Trump reportedly saying he’d rather have more immigrants from Norway and fewer from Haiti and “shithole countries” in Africa.

Trump has seemed to deny using those words but acknowledged on Twitter that he used “tough” language during White House negotiations this week with lawmakers on an immigration bill.

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the only Democrat at the meeting with Trump, confirmed the vulgar comments, telling reporters the president said “things that were hate-filled, vile and racist.”

Republican lawmakers who were in the Thursday meeting generally sidestepped questions about precisely what Trump said. Two Trump allies who were in attendance, Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia, issued a joint statement, saying they did "not recall the president saying those comments specifically.”

In their statement, the African ambassadors said they were concerned “about the continuing and growing trend from the US administration toward Africa and people of African descent to denigrate the continent and people of color.”

RE: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DTZDvT4UQAELyTl.jpg:large

The controversy, stemming from discussions about whether to include immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti and African countries in an immigration bill, appears to have dimmed chances of reaching a deal on immigration in the coming weeks.

Lawmakers are under a March 5 deadline to write legislation to fix the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA.

More: South Florida fights back against Trump comments

More: Over 24 hours, Trump exhibits two starkly different attitudes toward race in America

More: Did Trump use vulgar language at an immigration meeting? It depends who you ask

The program extends legal protections to 800,000 immigrants who entered the United States illegally as children. Trump ended the program and finding a legislative solution is a key issue in negotiations between the White House and congressional Democrats on immigration policy.

On Saturday morning, Trump took to Twitter to slam the Democrats over the controversy: “The Democrats are all talk and no action. They are doing nothing to fix DACA. Great opportunity missed. Too bad!”

An hour later, he reiterated that sentiment:

"I don’t believe the Democrats really want to see a deal on DACA. They are all talk and no action. This is the time but, day by day, they are blowing the one great opportunity they have. Too bad!"

Trump's allies have argued that the controversy over his remarks is overblown.

Anthony Scaramucci, whose brief tenure as White House communications director ended shortly after his expletive-filled comments about his administration colleagues appeared in The New Yorker, said Trump "is not a racist."

"Apparently he and I are the only two people that use a few curse words here and there," Scaramucci wrote on Twitter. "Certainly journalists don’t talk that way. Who knew lived in such a puritanical society!"

And other Trump backers said the president's remarks show he's aligned with a long-standing conservative push to reshape immigration policy into a merit-based system rather than one based on family ties or admitting those from countries beset by poverty.

“The point is, if you have a Ph.D., I don’t care what country you’re from, we want you,” Barry Bennett, a former Trump adviser, told The Hill newspaper.
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O Almighty Lord God, who neither slumberest nor sleepest; Protect and assist, we beseech thee, all those who at home or abroad, by land, by sea, or in the air, are serving this country, that they, being armed with thy defence, may be preserved evermore in all perils; and being filled with wisdom and girded with strength, may do their duty to thy honour and glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

"IN GOD WE TRUST"
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