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Old 04-17-2019, 09:38 AM
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Unhappy Left Wants To Stop Census Citizenship Question To Destroy Representative Government

Left wants to stop Census citizenship question to destroy representative government

By Bill Wilson

The rising chorus of the leftist meme reveals the legitimate fear they have for the move by the Trump Administration to ask one simple question on the upcoming Census; are you a citizen of the United States? To hear the horde of so-called “progressive” mouthpieces you would think the act of asking this question is tantamount to renouncing both the Magna Carta and the Declaration of Independence. The hyper-ventilating was on full display on April 15 by Catherine Rampell in the Pravda (Washington) Post in her piece, “The Trump administration’s census question degrades our data — and our democracy.”

According to Comrade Rampell, asking if a person is a citizen will accomplish two vile goals of the Trump dystopia. It will degrade the data collected by the Census and, of course, it will be a spike into the heart of our cherished mythological democracy. Unfortunately, on both counts the radical anti-American Left are dead wrong. In fact, they are aggressively demonstrating their long-term goals on destroying both honest data analytics and any semblance of representative government.

In the 15 Censuses conducted since 1870, the question has been asked in all but three cases. So, far from being some nefarious new weapon dreamed up by the Trump team, it is the historic norm to ask such a question. The more important question we should be asking ourselves is why the anti-American Left is so zealous in their demands that it not be asked? The answer, I fear, is all too apparent. They want open borders. They want an end to a sovereign United States. They crave the death of the principles of individual liberty, self-governance, and the rule of law. Every single act they take is aimed at these goals.

But, as we all know too well, facts no longer matter all that much in the post-reality world birthed by social media billionaires test marketing narratives to convince us to commit political suicide. So, let’s look at Rampell’s contentions.

First, data manipulation is exactly what asking the immigrant question is designed to prevent. Leftwing state governments are spending literally hundreds of millions of tax dollars to stack the census numbers. California will spend more than $150 million to push illegal immigrants to “answer the Census.” Illinois, who can’t pay their lottery winners or vendors, will spend $25 million to do the same thing. New York will spend $40 million. Why? Simple. Since federal funds are based on residents they want to grab as much money as they can from Uncle Sucker.

And the larger issue is representation in Congress itself. All three of the states listed above are projected to lose seats after the 2020 count. But all are spending heavily to get anyone who can hold a breath to respond to the Census in a raw power grab, to keep their over-represented rotten boroughs to centime their drive for control. If the question being asked makes it more difficult to get illegal aliens to pile on to stake the count and rig the Census, the Left will have to fight it tooth and nail, it is existential for them. And in fact, it is existential for the United States. If the question on citizenship is not asked, the final death rattle will not be far off.

Secondly, Rampell makes the now obligatory assertion that “the administration jeopardizes our democratic and economic health…” It seems that anything Trump wants to do hurts their “democracy.” It is all pure contrivance. We need to all remember the famous definition of democracy as two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner. As a representative republic, the United States was never and is not now a “democracy.” It is a system of checks and balances designed to keep the passions of the moment from harming the fundamental value; liberty.

And diluting our voting rolls with non-citizens harms liberty by diminishing the votes of all citizens. Padding the numbers of residents strikes a blow to liberty by triggering some bureaucratic formula to force small, independent states to pay for the insanity and perversity of a handful of leftist strongholds.

There is every reason to believe the citizenship question will survive. Even a John Roberts will find it a death blow to his frayed reputation to deny what has been done for 120 years to be done again. We all just need to be prepared for the temper tantrum that is sure to follow and do all that can be done to ensure the 2020 Census does not become the death notice of the United States.

Bill Wilson is a former board member and President of Americans for Limited Government.
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Old 04-17-2019, 10:27 AM
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Arrow What is the Electoral College?

What is the Electoral College?
RE: https://www.archives.gov/federal-reg...ege/about.html

Note: You have to go to this site where there are several links that you can get more specific data sections. I have to admit I didn't recall the entire electoral college reasoning. So I went for a refresher and looked it up. Maybe it will help other's why it's used.

What is the Electoral College?

The Electoral College is a process, not a place. The founding fathers established it in the Constitution as a compromise between election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens.

The Electoral College process consists of the selection of the electors, the meeting of the electors where they vote for President and Vice President, and the counting of the electoral votes by Congress.

The Electoral College consists of 538 electors. A majority of 270 electoral votes is required to elect the President. Your state’s entitled allotment of electors equals the number of members in its Congressional delegation: one for each member in the House of Representatives plus two for your Senators. Read more about the allocation of electoral votes.

Under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution, the District of Columbia is allocated 3 electors and treated like a state for purposes of the Electoral College. For this reason, in the following discussion, the word “state” also refers to the District of Columbia.

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Note: The Twenty-Third Amendment reads as follows:

(23rd) or Twenty-Third Amendment

Section 1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct:

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

This Link has more details: About the "Selection of each States Electors":
RE: https://www.archives.gov/federal-reg.../electors.html

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Each candidate running for President in your state has his or her own group of electors. The electors are generally chosen by the candidate’s political party, but state laws vary on how the electors are selected and what their responsibilities are. Read more about the qualifications of the Electors and restrictions on who the Electors may vote for.

The presidential election is held every four years on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. You help choose your state’s electors when you vote for President because when you vote for your candidate you are actually voting for your candidate’s electors.

Most states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all electors to the winning presidential candidate. However, Maine and Nebraska each have a variation of “proportional representation.” Read more about the allocation of Electors among the states and try to predict the outcome of the Electoral College vote.

After the presidential election, your governor prepares a “Certificate of Ascertainment” listing all of the candidates who ran for President in your state along with the names of their respective electors. The Certificate of Ascertainment also declares the winning presidential candidate in your state and shows which electors will represent your state at the meeting of the electors in December of the election year. Your state’s Certificates of Ascertainments are sent to the Congress and the National Archives as part of the official records of the presidential election. See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state officials, the Office of the Federal Register and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and the Congress in the Electoral College process.

The meeting of the electors takes place on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December after the presidential election. The electors meet in their respective states, where they cast their votes for President and Vice President on separate ballots. Your state’s electors’ votes are recorded on a “Certificate of Vote,” which is prepared at the meeting by the electors. Your state’s Certificates of Votes are sent to the Congress and the National Archives as part of the official records of the presidential election. See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state officials and the Congress in the Electoral College process.

Each state’s electoral votes are counted in a joint session of Congress on the 6th of January in the year following the meeting of the electors. Members of the House and Senate meet in the House chamber to conduct the official tally of electoral votes. See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the role and responsibilities of Congress in the Electoral College process.

The Vice President, as President of the Senate, presides over the count and announces the results of the vote. The President of the Senate then declares which persons, if any, have been elected President and Vice President of the United States.

The President-Elect takes the oath of office and is sworn in as President of the United States on January 20th in the year following the Presidential election.

On the site you can look up more details.

- Learn about the Electors
- How many electoral votes do States get?
- Who selects the Electors?
- What are the qualifications to be an Elector?
- Are there restrictions on who the Electors can vote for?

Roles and Responsibilities in the Electoral College Process

The Office of the Federal Register coordinates the functions of the Electoral College on behalf of the Archivist of the United States, the States, the Congress, and the American People. The Office of the Federal Register operates as an intermediary between the governors and secretaries of state of the States and the Congress. It also acts as a trusted agent of the Congress in the sense that it is responsible for reviewing the legal sufficiency of the certificates before the House and Senate accept them as evidence of official State action.

See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state officials, the Office of the Federal Register and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and the Congress in the Electoral College process.
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O Almighty Lord God, who neither slumberest nor sleepest; Protect and assist, we beseech thee, all those who at home or abroad, by land, by sea, or in the air, are serving this country, that they, being armed with thy defence, may be preserved evermore in all perils; and being filled with wisdom and girded with strength, may do their duty to thy honour and glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

"IN GOD WE TRUST"
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Old 04-17-2019, 10:47 AM
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Post Why Doesn't The Popular Vote Elect The President? You Can Thank Our Founding Fathers

Why Doesn't The Popular Vote Elect The President? You Can Thank Our Founding Fathers
By: Margaret Judson - Bustle 11-6-16
RE: https://www.bustle.com/articles/1921...unding-fathers

When it comes to voting in the U.S. presidential election, the fact is that in the current electoral system, votes boil down to two categories: the electoral vote and the popular vote, and they don't count equally. The electoral vote, handed down by the electors chosen by each state to be representatives in the Electoral College, is the one that ultimately decides who the next president will be. So, why doesn't the popular vote elect the president?

The Electoral College system makes sense when you consider the historical context. When the founding fathers were deciding how votes would go down as they constructed the never-before-imagined boundaries of the ground-breaking democratic system, they had to make some strategic decisions about exactly how much weight would go to individuals in the fledgling nation. One decision they made was to gather popular votes and funnel the tally of those votes through the Electoral College when it came time to elect a president. Since the founding fathers weren't so sure exactly how this whole thing would go and wanted to maintain control of a proverbial emergency break should the situation be deemed necessary.

While it's certainly not accurate to say the individual vote doesn't matter (and you definitely should vote), it is curbed by the Electoral College. That's why many modern scholars think the current system is in serious need of reform. Stanford University, Jack Rakove, for example, stated ways America could fix the potential problems caused by the founding fathers' Electoral College set-up:

This problem would disappear if we had a truly national election with one electorate and votes counting the same wherever they were cast. Then the candidates would have to think more creatively about how to mobilize a national electorate, rather than pouring money into the televised advertisements that must drive voters in the battleground states completely bonkers. The parties would have the incentive to attract voters throughout the country, which is now a matter of complete indifference to them.

So far, in United States history, the electoral vote has not reflected the popular vote results four times, which is almost 10 percent of the time. From my perspective, those aren't good enough odds for a system tasked with choosing the leader of the free world.
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O Almighty Lord God, who neither slumberest nor sleepest; Protect and assist, we beseech thee, all those who at home or abroad, by land, by sea, or in the air, are serving this country, that they, being armed with thy defence, may be preserved evermore in all perils; and being filled with wisdom and girded with strength, may do their duty to thy honour and glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

"IN GOD WE TRUST"
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