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The highest generalship is to compel the enemy to disperse his army, and then to concentrate superior force against each fraction in turn.

-- Col. Henderson
You Can Always Learn7318 Reads  Printer-friendly page

Airforce As I sometimes did, when the information for the next day's mission was slow in coming in, I would not call my driver but just get in my car and drive myself around the perimeter track, stopping now and then to talk to the men working on the planes. Of course, everything was blacked out. To drive we used a mere slit of light from the car's headlights to see the road.

One cold, rainy, dark night, I had circled the perimeter track and was heading back to the war room at headquarters, when I saw a G.I. walking not too steadily along the perimeter road. I stopped beside him, asked him where he was going and suggested he get in and I would take him there.

He settled himself in the seat, turned to me, and obviously thinking I was my driver, asked, "What do you think of that old bastard you work for?"

Somewhat startled, I told him that that old bastard was really a pretty good guy.

His response to that was that because I worked for him I had to say that, and, after all, I was not walking around in the rain as he was, but was riding in a warm, dry car.

So we discussed the old man and I did my best selling job when, to top off his argument, he said the old man really didn't know much, and especially about guarding airplanes. Now I had never thought much abot that. I suppose I just assumed the MPs knew their job, and were doing it even though we did get reports of sabotage once in a while.

About that time we arrived at the 68th Squadron area. As he got out, I asked for and was told his name.

The next morning, after the mission took off, I called the Commander of the 68th Squadron and gave him the soldier's name and said I wanted to see both the C.O. and the soldier in my office.

Shortly thereafter they both were announced by my Adjutant Major John Williams, and came into my office. I suggested they be seated and opened the conversation by asking the soldier if my car had picked him up the night before. He said it had. I then asked him if he said that the old man didn't know much... especially about guarding aircraft. His answer was "that damn driver talks too much."

I then told him that I was the driver. He jumped out of his chair, shook his fist and said it was "damned unfair to fool a fellow soldier like that."

I agreed it was unfair, but also wanted hi to tell me how he would guard aircraft.

He told me. He was right. He said that guards around aircraft should not walk post, they should not be visible. They should, in effect, hid out of site, but where they could see and hear anyone approaching the plane.

Later, I talked the idea over with Capt. Archie White of the MPs, and we adopted the idea of guarding our aircraft. At the next group commander's meeting I gave the idea to all 3rd Division Commands. I heard later that some were already guarding aircraft that way and that others then started it.

All because a G.I. told the C.O. he didn't know much, especially about guarding aircraft.

Note: by Joseph A. Moller, Commanding Officer, 390th Bomb Group


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