Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Online
There are 111 users online

You can register for a user account here.
Library of Congress

Military Quotes

Anybody who does not have fear is an idiot. It is just that you must make the fear work for you. When somebody shot at me, it made me madder than hell, and all I wanted to do was shoot back.

-- General Robin Olds

Current poll results


Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian contractors?

Yes79 %79 %79 % 79.48 % (306)
No16 %16 %16 % 16.10 % (62)
I do not know2 %2 %2 % 2.34 % (9)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.78 % (3)
Other, please list in comments1 %1 %1 % 1.30 % (5)

Total votes: 385
One vote is allowed per day

[ Voting booth | Other polls ]

Comments

Display Order
Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 06, 2005

If "yes", then what should they do differently?


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by GoldenDragon
on Aug 19, 2005

Yes or No? I don't know but I think the most important thing is to allow those on the ground and in the line of fire to determine whatever logistical assistance they might need and the ability to get that assistance where ever they can get it, either military or civilian. "Whatever it takes to get the job done." From what I've seen or read in the news there's a bunch of carpet baggers over there trying to cash in and crying real loud when they end up gettin' shot at.


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 22, 2005
After a lot of years working as a welder on a military installation, Pine Bluff Arsenal, I woud say Yes, our Goverment farms out way to much
as far as work. Things like lawn care, What ever happened to a post replacement company? How about the Guys that EARNED there EXTRA DUTY from a Bar fight. Those days are gone. The jobs that were once dished out as punashment,shit thay pay (upto) $22.00hr now for what we us to get for throwing on a good one.
Yes our goverment has made our military way to inticing to the public.
There are areas that should be left alone and set aside for the military and the military alone, not just the War fighting.
I took my father who is retired Air Force, To a visit with a Doctor at Little Rock Air Base.
From the guards at the front gate to the doctors in the hospital, every one we seen that day was civilan, exept for a few solders around the flight line.
Yes there is way to much Civilan Goverment, running our MILITARY.

Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 29, 2005

It is good and it's bad. it's good cause some work centers need that kind of redundancy, some one who's always there and knows how things are done so when new troops come in they are on the same page and things don't get futzed up when new commands come in. Now the down side is that sometimes civies get it in their head that they dont' hav eto answer to the gov't and can do what they want cause their contractors. Also i think it sucks that military decisions as far as money and manning and such are being made by civilians and the military people are only being consulted and not actually part of the final deceisions.


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Sep 03, 2005
Were I to be trapped in New Orleans today, I'd prefer to see some uniforms coming in.


Only logged in users are allowed to comment. register/log in
Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Do you think violence against U.S. forces in Iraq will diminish after Iraq holds its elections?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 85

This Day in History
1916: The Russians force the Turkish 3rd Army back to Erzurum.

1942: General MacArthur repels the Japanese in Bataan.

1943: The deportation of Jews from the Warsaw ghetto to the concentration camp at Treblinka is resumed-but not without much bloodshed and resistance along the way.

1945: The German Army launches its second attempt to relieve the besieged city of Budapest from the advancing Red Army.

1950: Peoples Republic of China formally recognizes the communist Democratic Republic of Vietnam and agrees to furnish it military assistance.

1951: China rejected the U.N. cease-fire proposal as the Eighth Army re-entered Wonju without opposition.

1953: U.S. Navy carrier aircraft hit targets at Wonsan, Songjin, Hungnam and Changyon on the North Korea's east coast while surface elements fired on Sinchon and Kosong targets.

1953: The U.S. Coast Guards were dispatched from Sangley Point to save the crew of a Navy Lockheed P2V reconnaissance plane. They landed in 12-foot seas, risking their own crew to save their Navy counterparts. The Coast Guard fished 11 survivors from the wrecked plane. Tragically the Coast Guards port engine failed during take off, slamming the plane back into the cold waters of the South China Sea. Seven of the rescued Navy fliers survived this second crash; however, most of the Coast Guard crew was lost.

1962: The United States begins spraying foliage with herbicides in South Vietnam, in order to reveal the whereabouts of Vietcong guerrillas.

1985: For the first time since joining the World Court in 1946, the United States walks out of a case. The case that caused the dramatic walkout concerned U.S. paramilitary activities against the Nicaraguan government.