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Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian contractors?

Yes79 %79 %79 % 79.43 % (309)
No16 %16 %16 % 16.20 % (63)
I do not know2 %2 %2 % 2.31 % (9)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.77 % (3)
Other, please list in comments1 %1 %1 % 1.29 % (5)

Total votes: 389
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 06, 2005

If "yes", then what should they do differently?


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by GoldenDragon
on Aug 19, 2005

Yes or No? I don't know but I think the most important thing is to allow those on the ground and in the line of fire to determine whatever logistical assistance they might need and the ability to get that assistance where ever they can get it, either military or civilian. "Whatever it takes to get the job done." From what I've seen or read in the news there's a bunch of carpet baggers over there trying to cash in and crying real loud when they end up gettin' shot at.


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 22, 2005
After a lot of years working as a welder on a military installation, Pine Bluff Arsenal, I woud say Yes, our Goverment farms out way to much
as far as work. Things like lawn care, What ever happened to a post replacement company? How about the Guys that EARNED there EXTRA DUTY from a Bar fight. Those days are gone. The jobs that were once dished out as punashment,shit thay pay (upto) $22.00hr now for what we us to get for throwing on a good one.
Yes our goverment has made our military way to inticing to the public.
There are areas that should be left alone and set aside for the military and the military alone, not just the War fighting.
I took my father who is retired Air Force, To a visit with a Doctor at Little Rock Air Base.
From the guards at the front gate to the doctors in the hospital, every one we seen that day was civilan, exept for a few solders around the flight line.
Yes there is way to much Civilan Goverment, running our MILITARY.

Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 29, 2005

It is good and it's bad. it's good cause some work centers need that kind of redundancy, some one who's always there and knows how things are done so when new troops come in they are on the same page and things don't get futzed up when new commands come in. Now the down side is that sometimes civies get it in their head that they dont' hav eto answer to the gov't and can do what they want cause their contractors. Also i think it sucks that military decisions as far as money and manning and such are being made by civilians and the military people are only being consulted and not actually part of the final deceisions.


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Sep 03, 2005
Were I to be trapped in New Orleans today, I'd prefer to see some uniforms coming in.


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