Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Online
There are 373 users online

You can register for a user account here.
Library of Congress

Military Quotes

Go forward until the last round is fired and the last drop of gas is expended...then go forward on foot!

-- General George Patton Jr

Current poll results


Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian contractors?

Yes79 %79 %79 % 79.53 % (307)
No16 %16 %16 % 16.06 % (62)
I do not know2 %2 %2 % 2.33 % (9)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.78 % (3)
Other, please list in comments1 %1 %1 % 1.30 % (5)

Total votes: 386
One vote is allowed per day

[ Voting booth | Other polls ]

Comments

Display Order
Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 06, 2005

If "yes", then what should they do differently?


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by GoldenDragon
on Aug 19, 2005

Yes or No? I don't know but I think the most important thing is to allow those on the ground and in the line of fire to determine whatever logistical assistance they might need and the ability to get that assistance where ever they can get it, either military or civilian. "Whatever it takes to get the job done." From what I've seen or read in the news there's a bunch of carpet baggers over there trying to cash in and crying real loud when they end up gettin' shot at.


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 22, 2005
After a lot of years working as a welder on a military installation, Pine Bluff Arsenal, I woud say Yes, our Goverment farms out way to much
as far as work. Things like lawn care, What ever happened to a post replacement company? How about the Guys that EARNED there EXTRA DUTY from a Bar fight. Those days are gone. The jobs that were once dished out as punashment,shit thay pay (upto) $22.00hr now for what we us to get for throwing on a good one.
Yes our goverment has made our military way to inticing to the public.
There are areas that should be left alone and set aside for the military and the military alone, not just the War fighting.
I took my father who is retired Air Force, To a visit with a Doctor at Little Rock Air Base.
From the guards at the front gate to the doctors in the hospital, every one we seen that day was civilan, exept for a few solders around the flight line.
Yes there is way to much Civilan Goverment, running our MILITARY.

Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Aug 29, 2005

It is good and it's bad. it's good cause some work centers need that kind of redundancy, some one who's always there and knows how things are done so when new troops come in they are on the same page and things don't get futzed up when new commands come in. Now the down side is that sometimes civies get it in their head that they dont' hav eto answer to the gov't and can do what they want cause their contractors. Also i think it sucks that military decisions as far as money and manning and such are being made by civilians and the military people are only being consulted and not actually part of the final deceisions.


Re: Does the U.S. military rely too heavily upon civilian co
by Anonymous
on Sep 03, 2005
Were I to be trapped in New Orleans today, I'd prefer to see some uniforms coming in.


Only logged in users are allowed to comment. register/log in
Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Should the military be used to enforce quarantines in the event of pandemic disease outbreaks?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 886

This Day in History
1787: Small farmers in Springfield, Massachusetts led by Daniel Shays, revolt against tax laws. Federal troops break up the protesters of what becomes known as Shays Rebellion.

1863: General Ambrose Burnside is removed as commander of the Army of the Potomac. General Joe Hooker took over command.

1919: The League of Nations, the forerunner of the United Nations, is formed in Paris, France. Lloyd George of Britain, Orlando of Italy, Clemenceau of France, and Woodrow Wilson of the United States are the original signers of the Leagues charter.

1943: The last German airfield in Stalingrad is captured by the Red Army.

1949: Axis Sally, who broadcasted Nazi propaganda to U.S. troops in Europe, stands trial in the United States for war crimes.

1951: General Ridgway and I and IX Corps launched Operation THUNDERBOLT, a counteroffensive northward to the Han River. This large-scale reconnaissance in force was the first ground offensive since the full-scale intervention of the Chinese. The purpose of the operation was to determine the enemys disposition of forces and reestablish contact.

1952: During the third largest aerial victory of the Korean War, F-86s shot down 10 MiG-15s and damaged three others without suffering any losses.

1953: Operation SMACK was launched in the western I Corps sector by the U.S. 7th Infantry Division. This air-ground coordinated test strike lasted three hours and involved close air support in concert with a combined arms task force of tanks, infantry and artillery. The operation achieved disappointing results.

1969: The first fully attended meeting of the formal Paris peace talks is held. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, the chief negotiator for the United States, urged an immediate restoration of a genuine DMZ as the first "practical move toward peace."