Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Online
There are 235 users online

You can register for a user account here.
Library of Congress

Military Quotes

You must love soldiers in order to understand them, and understand them in order to lead them.

-- Henri Turenne

Current poll results


Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ?

Yes52 %52 %52 % 52.04 % (140)
No39 %39 %39 % 39.41 % (106)
I do not know6 %6 %6 % 6.32 % (17)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.37 % (1)
Other, please list in comments1 %1 %1 % 1.86 % (5)

Total votes: 269
One vote is allowed per day

[ Voting booth | Other polls ]

Comments

Display Order
Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by SEATJERKER
on Oct 15, 2006

If any military action is required because of NKP' belligerence, I suggest cruie/Tomahawk missles at the target areas that will cause them as much confusion/military loss as possible. It would also avoid collateral damage, although that is a lessening condition in my mind. Enough missles should be readily available so that a continuous flow of organized death by air is delivered. The NKP needs to have their collective noses bloodied quite handily in order for them to get the message. Explicit with our missles shold be the warning that any cross-border exccursion/invasion by the NKP will result in massive bombing, to include nukes. Call the bastards' bluff.


Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by
on Oct 16, 2006
... No, pull them off, and out, and send in the Air Force with enough heavy eq. to not only blody their lip, but knock out a few teeth in the meantime,...

...lighting off a nuke, even a "small" one should be reason enough to take full action, and squash any, and all aspirations of further development,...

...

Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by Anonymous
on Nov 01, 2006

With 25+ thousand, (all over the country) they wouldn't make a dent, on the front lines. And as previously said, RAIN from the air, enough necessary to get more than their attention. And understand when that is done, Seoul is destructed. Plus the North has been digging underground tunnels etc., for 50+ years, so it would take a CONTINUED air effort to get the results necessary.


Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by Anonymous
on Nov 25, 2006
What Scout said, or something very similar to that.

More troops there won't solve a thing, nor (for the moment) will fewer.

Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by Anonymous
on Dec 07, 2006

AMEN to scout!!!


Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by Anonymous
on Jan 01, 2007

No, we shouldn't increase U.S. forces. in South Korea. let the host countries handle their own security. We should not be the "worlds keeper'. In this day and age of nuclear power, conventional forces are not any deterent to aggressive nations. Pull out all U.S. troops.


Re: Should U.S. force strength be increased on the DMZ in li
by Anonymous
on Jan 01, 2007

There is no such thing as a "small nuke". Let South Korea handle the situation. Japan needs to get off their ass and increase their own military security and quit using the US Military. Let Japan spend some money on military hardware and quit selling Toyotas at cheap, bargain prices (because they have no Federal tax for this military expense) around the world while big daddy U.S. protects them!


Only logged in users are allowed to comment. register/log in
Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

The people who most influenced my decision to join the military are

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 236

This Day in History
1862: Union troops push 5,000 confederates out of Maysbille, Ark., at the Second Battle of Pea Ridge.

1863: Colonel Benjamin Griersons troops bring destruction to central Mississippi on a two-week raid along the entire length of the state

1864: Confederate General John Bell Hood pulls his battered army into Guntersville, Alabama, but finds the Tennessee River difficult to cross. Plotting another attack against the Yankees, he continues traveling westward with his defeated army.



1942: American Maj. Gen. Mark Clark meets in Algeria with French officials loyal to the Allied cause, as well as Resistance fighters, regarding the launch of Operation Torch, the first Allied amphibious landing of the war.

1951: U.N. and communist liaison officers signed an agreement to resume armistice talks. Both sides agreed to move the talks from Kaesong to Panmunjom and defined a neutral zone around the area.

1954: As a result of the Geneva accords granting Communist control over North Vietnam, U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower authorizes a crash program to train the South Vietnamese Army.

1955: The prototype of the F-105 Thunder Chief makes its maiden flight.

1962: President John F. Kennedy announces that U.S. spy planes have discovered Soviet missile bases in Cuba.

1972: In Saigon, Henry Kissinger meets with South Vietnamese President Thieu to secure his approval of a proposed cease-fire that had been worked out at the secret peace talks with the North Vietnamese in Paris. Thieu rejected the proposed accord.