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Whether in an advantageous position or a disadvantageous one, the opposite state should be always present to your mind.

-- Ts`ao Kung

Current poll results


Should military training areas be exempt from environmental protection laws?

Yes58 %58 %58 % 58.50 % (86)
No35 %35 %35 % 35.37 % (52)
I do not know2 %2 %2 % 2.72 % (4)
I have no opinion1 %1 %1 % 1.36 % (2)
Other, please list in comments2 %2 %2 % 2.04 % (3)

Total votes: 147
One vote is allowed per day

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Comments

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Re: Should military training areas be exempt from environmen
by Anonymous
on Oct 20, 2002
Assuming the environmental "laws" are sane to begin with, then no decent commander would even SEND troops into an area, unless warfare gave no other possible choice, where there was ANY reasonable risk of making people sick or dead. And, under no circumstances should military training areas be exempt, whether laws are on the books or not, ever. In fact, our military should not be going around anywhere in the world making OTHER people's homelands environmentally unsafe either...bombs, bullets, blood and landmines are plenty bad already. We're not talkin' about spotted owls and silvery minnows here...
Bluehawk

Re: Should military training areas be exempt from environmen
by Anonymous
on Oct 20, 2002

What he said. Why you wanna get sick


Re: Should military training areas be exempt from environmen
by David
on Oct 20, 2002

I originally voted Yes to this. It was a real hassle to bag dirty sand and go driving around cleaning stuff up before and after field exercises. I always felt we could have better spent our time training rather then on police call. After reading the above comments though and thinking about the uranium and other materials we left in the Gulf I have to answer No now. There is no need for military personnel to be exposed any more then necessary to environmentally hazardous material. The material should be removed by contracted technicians trained in such matters, not by soldier, sailors and marines who have no training in this and have far more important ways to spend their training time.


Re: Should military training areas be exempt from environmen
by
on Nov 02, 2002
Both YES & NO.

YES, since even The Military shouldn't foul its very own drinking water or the air "They" must breath.

NO, since to protect creatures of the forest and the forest itself in Live Fire Training Areas, would be quite asinine at best.

Neil

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