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Military Quotes

It is the unconquerable nature of man and not the nature of the weapon he uses that ensures victory.

-- General George Patton Jr

Current poll results


Should the United States Focus its Resources on Building a Missile Defense System?

Yes69 %69 %69 % 69.07 % (67)
No24 %24 %24 % 24.74 % (24)
I do not know4 %4 %4 % 4.12 % (4)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.00 % (0)
Other, please list in comments2 %2 %2 % 2.06 % (2)

Total votes: 97
One vote is allowed per day

[ Voting booth | Other polls ]

Comments

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Re: Should the United States Focus its Resources on Building
by Anonymous
on Dec 23, 2002
One might think so...but then, a) we are unable to protect ourselves from our own airplanes being flown into/bombers driving up to public buildings and murdering thousands, b) any government choosing to attack this nation with so much as ONE missile would, probably, be reduced to dark gray ashes and little else in less than 30 minutes (so long as we still had any electricity with which to operate systems) and, c) evidently our government's enemies have found it unnecessary to go to any other elaborate technological extremes in order to have very destructive effects on us. So, what would be the point of building a "Missile Defense System" again? Don't we need to do be doing some other far more "focused" important and longer neglected work with those not-endless tax dollars?
Just thought I'd ask the enthusiasts out there...
Bluehawk

Re: Should the United States Focus its Resources on Building
by SEATJERKER
on Dec 24, 2002

One might examine the history of SAC, with a massive expenditure of capital and effort to maintain a position of strength against the Soviet Union. We will probably never know if it was the diligence of SAC, the paranoia of the Soviet military heirarchy, or the mutually assumed destruction that was ensue from any nuclear exchange that prevented this type of Armageddon. A missle defense system might never be used, but I'd much rather have a weapon system and never have to use it than to suffer an attack, and wish we would have had some defensive mechanism in place. And we should not ever apologize to anyone if we want to build one. Nor ask permission of anyone either.


Re: Should the United States Focus its Resources on Building
by Anonymous
on Dec 28, 2002
Certainly NOT. Let's wait (like all the pundits relate) until we see the first missle coming at us, "AND THEN THE AMERICAN PUBLIC WILL HAVE THE PROOF" that seems to be the hue and cry, of today.
SF
NC

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Military History
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Should we be continuing to close U.S. military bases in light of current conflicts?

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Votes: 111

This Day in History
1699: The Treaty of Karlowitz ends the war between Austria and the Turks.

1863: General Joseph Hooker assumes command of the Army of the Potomac following Ambrose Burnside.

1942: American Expeditionary Force lands in Northern Ireland.

1943: The first OSS (Office of Strategic Services) agent parachutes behind Japanese lines in Burma.

1945: Soviet troops enter Auschwitz, Poland, freeing the survivors of the network of concentration camps. Auschwitz was a group of camps, designated I, II, and III. There were also 40 smaller "satellite" camps.

1945: The most decorated soldier of WWII, American Lt. Audie Murphy, is wounded in France. Perhaps as interesting as his service record and later film career was his public admission that he suffered severe depression from post traumatic stress syndrome, also called battle fatigue, and became addicted to sleeping pills as a result. This had long been a taboo subject for veterans.

1951: U.S. warships bombarded Inchon for the second time during the war. The first was during the initial allied invasion, Sept. 15, 1950.

1953: Surface ships blasted coastal targets as the USS Missouri completed a 46-hour bombardment of Songjin.

1953: The last F4U Corsair rolled off the Chance Vought Aircraft Company production line. Despite the dawning of the jet age, this World War II fighter remained in production due to its vital close-air support role in the Korean War. Almost 12,000 Corsairs were produced in various models.

1970: U.S. Navy Lt. Everett Alvarez Jr. spends his 2,000th day in captivity in Southeast Asia. First taken prisoner when his plane was shot down on August 5, 1964, he became the longest-held confirmed POW in U.S. history. Alvarez was released in 1973 after spending over eight years in captivity.