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Has the U.S. military taken adequate precautions to prevent a recurrence of the Gulf War illnesses?

Yes10 %10 %10 % 10.24 % (13)
No63 %63 %63 % 63.78 % (81)
I do not know23 %23 %23 % 23.62 % (30)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.00 % (0)
Other, please list in comments2 %2 %2 % 2.36 % (3)

Total votes: 127
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Has the U.S. military taken adequate precautions to prev
by Anonymous
on Feb 10, 2003
One can hope the "brass" will do their duty, but certainly those on the front lines will do all they can to prepare people and cope with the results. I'm skeptical about the former though...the Navy still will not exonerate the skipper(s) of the U.S.S. Indianapolis. Whichever new weapons are about to be deployed in Iraq may create some unheard of calamities for everyone involved on all sides along the lines of "Atomic Vets" (one of whom was my father), "Agent Orange", "Gulf War Syndrome" and all the others...it just seems pretty much inevitable. War is a nasty business, every time.
Bluehawk

Re: Has the U.S. military taken adequate precautions to prev
by SEATJERKER
on Feb 12, 2003

There does not appear to be unanimity within the medical profession or in the military intelligence community as to what Gulf War Illness is, much less what caused it. This lack of consensus only compounds the search for adequate prophylactic measures and for treatment measures as well. I do believe that the tactical commanders have been issued the requisite materiel to meet the threat; couple this with tactical surprise, multiple avenues of attack, multiple means of attack, and I believe that the Coalition Forces will quickly overwhelm the enemy.


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