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Are the call-ups of National Guard and Reserve units hurting force retention?

Yes62 %62 %62 % 62.03 % (49)
No31 %31 %31 % 31.65 % (25)
I do not know5 %5 %5 % 5.06 % (4)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.00 % (0)
Other, please list in comments1 %1 %1 % 1.27 % (1)

Total votes: 79
One vote is allowed per day

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Comments

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Re: Are the call-ups of National Guard and Reserve forces he
by Anonymous
on Mar 27, 2004

Retention of what, or whom?


Re: Are the call-ups of National Guard and Reserve forces he
by Anonymous
on Mar 27, 2004
First of all the question asks if it is hurting or helping and then the answers are yes or no. I'm a little confused by that.

But in my opinion, I think the call-ups are hurting retention. Its not hurting recruiting, but after troops come home from the war there are many who choose not to reinlist.

Just my observation of folks around here.
DL

Re: Are the call-ups of National Guard and Reserve units hur
by David
on Mar 28, 2004
My mistake on the wording. Should make a little more sense now.

I do not think this is really related to the call-ups of Guard or Reserve units.

I think anytime we are in active combat force retention is reduced. I always wondered why there were no Vietnam veterans among my D.I.'s during basic training. After finally asking one of them they told me most people got out of the military after coming home from Vietnam. I felt the same way after the Gulf War and so did most of my friends.

Re: Are the call-ups of National Guard and Reserve units hur
by GoldenDragon
on Apr 02, 2004

See: "AWOL Mom Can Stay In U.S." post


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