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Should the U.S. government be allowed to prohibit media coverage of returning war casualties?

Yes44 %44 %44 % 44.07 % (52)
No49 %49 %49 % 49.15 % (58)
I do not know4 %4 %4 % 4.24 % (5)
I have no opinion1 %1 %1 % 1.69 % (2)
Other, please list in comments0 %0 %0 % 0.85 % (1)

Total votes: 118
One vote is allowed per day

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Comments

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Re: Should the US government be allowed to prohibit media co
by Anonymous
on Sep 10, 2004

Men and women die in the forces, this is fact of life, I think the main problem is that some people try and make political capital out of this sad time on the way they put it over. Now have I seen CNN cover it at times by just showing a photo of the person in happier times with a caption of Fallen Hero. Now I am not an American but I have served in the UK armed forces, but I feel that those who died in a combat zone should be acknowledged.


Re: Should the US government be allowed to prohibit media co
by GoldenDragon
on Sep 16, 2004

The family should be asked first if they wish to have a media frenzy created over their loved one. If the family chooses to not have, the paparazzi swarming over the grave then the government should prohibit the coverage and the families' wishes should be honored.


Re: Should the US government be allowed to prohibit media co
by David
on Sep 16, 2004

I agree.


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