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Should the U.S. military stop using the 9mm round and return to the higher power .45?

Yes81 %81 %81 % 81.94 % (118)
No10 %10 %10 % 10.42 % (15)
I do not know1 %1 %1 % 1.39 % (2)
I have no opinion4 %4 %4 % 4.17 % (6)
Other, please list in comments2 %2 %2 % 2.08 % (3)

Total votes: 144
One vote is allowed per day

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Comments

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Re: Should the US military stop using the 9mm round and retu
by
on Oct 27, 2004

If I were going into combat tomorrow there is no doubt in my mind that I would prefer to carry the 1911A1 to any other sidearm.However the NATO standard went to 9mm for the standard sidearm and that's the ammo that is stockpiled all over the place.A .45cal. pistol is pretty usless if all you can get is 9mm ammo.


Re: Should the US military stop using the 9mm round and retu
by Anonymous
on Nov 07, 2004
I am of the opinion that there should be a heavier, man stopper round, in the service pistol.

They could even split the difference between 9mm and .45 Cal, with a .40 Cal bullet, such as the Glock 23.

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