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Coast Guard Medal Award Citations, K-M

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KALLELIS, John A., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 13 October 1982
Date of Award: 18 December 1982

Seaman KALLELIS is cited for heroism on the day of 13 October 1982 while serving as boat crewman on the Motor Life Boat (MLB) CG-44315 engaged in search and rescue operations at the entrance to the Merrimac River, Newburyport, Massachusetts. Upon notification that a small boat had capsized ? mile north of the north jetty with 2 people in the water, the MLB was dispatched. Upon arriving on scene Seaman KALLELIS entered the 15 foot breaking seas and proceeded to swim to the 2 people. Reaching the closer one approximately 30 feet from the MLB, Seaman KALLELIS grabbed hold of him and they were hauled back aboard the MLB. Seaman KALLELIS immediately swam back to, and rescued, the semi-conscious second person. Seaman KALLELIS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent danger in this rescue. Seaman KALLELIS? unselfish actions, courage, unwavering devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Galvin, Kevin S.)


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KAUFMAN, JEFFREY L., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 22 August 1976
Date of Award: 13 April 1978

Seaman KAUFMAN is cited for heroism on the morning of 22 August 1976 when he rescued a man from drowning south of the Nehalem River bar, Oregon. Upon notification that a 20-foot pleasure craft had capsized south of the bar, Seaman KAUFMAN was dispatched from Coast Guard Station, Tillamook Bay, Oregon as a member of a beach party. Arriving on scene, Seaman KAUFMAN observed an eight-foot breaker hit the capsized craft, throwing the two survivors into the water. One of the men screamed that he could not swim and the other appeared to be unconscious. Seaman KAUFMAN immediately entered the water and swam toward the distressed persons. Reaching the hapless victims, he took the unconscious man in tow and proceeded to shore. After the man was safely brought onto the beach, Seaman KAUFMAN administered first aid to the survivors until the arrival of medial authorities. Seaman KAUFMAN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Seipp, Frank F.)


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KELLEY, David W., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 08 August 1975
Date of Award: 18 October 1976

Seaman KELLEY is cited for heroism on the night of 8 August 1975 while serving as the crewman of a 13-foot Zodiac test boat during the rescue of the pilot of a downed aircraft in heavy seas off Race Point Light, Provincetown, Massachusetts. Upon notification of the downed plane, Seaman KELLEY and a rescue crew from Coast Guard Station Race Point proceeded to the scene and upon arrival were confronted with turbulent seas and high winds that severely hampered the launching of the rescue boat. After repeated attempts, the boat was launched and with no navigational equipment, maneuvered toward the pilot?s cries for help. Within minutes the gravely injured pilot was located and with complete disregard for his own safety, Seaman KELLEY grasped the hapless pilot and brought him safely into the rescue boat. As the boat approached shore, the violent seas capsized the rescue craft, hurling the occupants into the raging surf. Injured in the capsizing, Seaman KELLEY reached shore where the victim was receiving medal attention. When notified that another person was on board the downed aircraft, Seaman KELLEY, despite his injury, attempted to return to the plane. T his attempt was thwarted by the fierceness of the seas that prevented the boat from being launched. Seaman KELLEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Rogean, Edward J.)


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KELLEY, Todd M., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 14 October 1984
Date of Award: 26 March 1985

Citation not on file.


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KLACZKIEWICZ, Michael, Electrician's Mate First Class, USCGR

Date of Action: 16 September 1990
Date of Award: 07 November 1991

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Huffman, James B. and Trahan, Leo J. In addition, a Gold Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Jean L. Colby, USCG Auxiliary, for her role in this rescue.)


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KLEUSKENS, Jeffrey A., Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 18-19 December 1978
Date of Award: 14 May 1980

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Swank, William R., Vennie, Mark L., and Weaver, Charles C.)


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KLOCK, Gail K., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 03 September 1978
Date of Award: 03 May 1979

Seaman KLOCK is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 3 September 1978 when he rescued a young girl from drowning in the pounding surf north of Fogarty Creek, Oregon. Upon notification of two girls being swept into the sea, Seaman KLOCK was dispatched from Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay, Oregon as a member of a beach party. Arriving on scene, one of the girls was observed clinging to a rock with the turbulent surf breaking over her. Seaman KLOCK immediately donned a swimmer?s harness and, with other members of the beach party tending the line, began to descend a sixty-foot cliff to the water near the helpless girl. As he reached a level approximately 15-feet above the surf, a breaker swept the girl off the rock. With total disregard for his own safety, Seaman KLOCK threw a life-preserver into the surf, leaped into the water, and swam to the girl. Reaching the hapless girl, Seaman KLOCK supported her while he made his way back to the base of the cliff. As he struggled to keep their heads above water while the surf pounded them relentlessly, Seaman KLOCK fashioned a sling from a lowered line and secured it to the girl. First the girl, and then Seaman KLOCK were then hoisted up the cliff. Reaching safety, Seaman KLOCK began treatment for hypothermia until the arrival of an ambulance. With the girl safely in the ambulance, Seaman KLOCK, although physically battered and exhausted, proceeded 600-yards up the beach to where the other girl had been pulled from the sea and began administering CPR. He persistently continued CPR in the ambulance on the way to the hospital where the girl was transferred to medical authorities. Seaman KLOCK demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


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KOPLAN, Richard Morley, Seaman, USCGR

Date of Action: 05 August 1967
Date of Award: 02 November 1967

For heroism on the morning of August 5, 1967 while serving as a crew member on board the CG-36531, engaged in the perilous rescue of three persons from a pleasure craft which capsized on the bar at Nehalem River, Oregon. Maintaining a safety patrol at the mouth of the river, CG-36531 arrived almost immediately and Seaman KOPLAN threw a life preserver to the first person observed in the water and pulled him to safety. When his attempts to reach a second person with a life ring were of no avail, due to the action of the breakers, he unhesitatingly entered the 49o water, swam to a woman and supported her until they were pulled to the lifeboat by a line. Upon sighting a small child wearing a life jacket, floating among debris, Seaman KOPLAN reentered the water, swam to her, and returned her to the boat. While still in the water, he reached another woman, floating face down, and swam with her to the lifeboat where both were pulled aboard. While the CG-36531 was proceeding to shore, Seaman KOPLAN administered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to the last victim until relieved by medical personnel. The CG-36531 then returned to the scene and assisted in retrieving the capsized boat. Seaman KOPLAN demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Hargrave, Henry M.)


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KYVIK, Eric, Boatswain?s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action: 30 June 1985
Date of Award: 27 October 1985

Petty Officer KYVIK is cited for heroism on the night of 30 June 1985 when he rescued a drowning man in the frigid eaters of the Manitowoc River, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Petty Officer KYVIK was returning to the USCGC MESQUITE from authorized liberty when he saw several police officers standing on the Eighth Street Bridge. As Petty Officer KYVIK approached the bridge, he noticed a man foundering in the water approximately 25-feet below. Without regard for his own safety, Petty Officer KYVIK jumped from the bridge to rescue the drowning man. Petty Officer KYVIK reached the man, who had then become motionless as a result of the cold water, and held him on the surface to prevent him from drowning. He then began pulling the man to shore, while a shipmate, who had also jumped in to assist, attempted to revive him. A passing boater soon arrived and offered his vessel to transport the victim to shore. Petty Officer KYVIK continued to treat the victim for shock and helped him maintain his body heat until relieved by local paramedics. As a result of Petty Officer KYVIK?s actions, the man subsequently recovered. Petty Officer KYVIK demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and extreme daring in spite of imminent personal danger in the saving of a man?s life. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Waldron, Grant W.)


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LANGLOIS, George R., Boatswain?s Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 03 July 1980
Date of Award: 02 February 1981

Petty Officer LANGLOIS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 3 July 1980 while serving as the coxswain of Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat (MLB) 44379. During this period he was instrumental in preventing the yacht FANTASY ISLE, with five people on board, from capsizing on the stormy Tillamook Bay entrance Bar. To escape the remains of Tropical Storm Celia, the owner/operator of FANTASY ISLE elected to seek shelter in Tillamook Bay, Oregon. Arriving outside the Bay in the late afternoon, the bar entrance was completely covered with breaking seas up to 30-feet in height. With the crew of FANTASY ISLE completely exhausted and seasick, the owner/operator believed he was in a ?do-or-die? situation and informed Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay that he was going to cross the bar. Two Coast Guard rescue boats were immediately dispatched to escort the yacht across the Bar. Arriving on scene two miles off-shore, Petty Officer LANGLOIS placed his MLB behind FANTASY ISLE and took the first breaking wave broadside thereby taking the full force of the breaker before it could reach the yacht. Petty Officer LANGLOIS continued this highly dangerous procedure, taking breaker after breaker, for the next 40 minutes until FANTASY ISLE was safely inside Tillamook Bay. Petty Officer LANGLOIS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during this incident. His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Dixon, Richard D.)


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LANGSTAFF, Eric M., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 05 January 1980
Date of Award: 29 April 1980

Petty Officer LANGSTAFF is cited for extraordinary heroism on 5 January 1980 when he assisted in the rescue of two men from the grounded barge MICHEL F in the turbulent surf near Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey. Upon notification of the grounding, Petty Officer LANGSTAFF departed Coast Guard Station New Haven as the engineer on board Coast Guard Motor Life Boat CG-44355 and proceeded to the scene despite heavy surf and a driving snowstorm. Arriving on scene, the barge was observed engulfed in 20-foot breakers, lying broadside to the surf, approximately 1-mile offshore. As the coxswain maneuvered the CG-44355 closer to the hapless barge, Petty Officer LANGSTAFF braved the heavy surf and blinding snow while moving hand-over-hand along the rail toward the bow of the motor life boat. Reaching the bow, he tied himself to the rail and waited as the motor life boat was brought along side MICHEL F. At that moment the two men, who had been trapped in a leaking deckhouse of the 300-foot barge, broke out of the deckhouse and waded through waist deep water to the rail and vaulted over it into Petty Officer LANSGTAFF?s arms. He then passed them to other Coast Guard personnel on deck of CG-44355. Petty Officer LANGSTAFF was then recovered from the rail as the motor life boat proceeded seaward to safety. Petty Officer LANGSTAFF demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Greer, Matthew C., Quinn, Truppa, Chris P., and Daryl G., White, Robert M.)


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LARUE, Joe S., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 04 July 1980
Date of Award: 02 February 1981

Seaman LARUE is cited for heroism on the morning of 4 July 1980 while serving as a crewmember of Motor Life Boat CG-44409 from Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay, Oregon. During this period he assisted in the rescue of 4 men from a capsized small pleasure craft in turbulent surf in the entrance to Tillamook Bay. The boat had dashed around the tip of the north entrance jetty, directly into the path of a 15 to 18-foot breaking sea. The boat capsized. Two of the four occupants were hurled through the windshield before being thrown into the turbulent sea. CG-44409, on station as a safety boat during an escort operation, was in position one wave behind the capsized boat and was directed to attempt to make the pickup. The coxswain skillfully maneuvered the MLB alongside the capsized boat, which resulted in the bow of the MLB being less than 50 to 75 feet from the rocks of the jetty with the stern facing into the breakers. Stationed in the well deck to pick up survivors, and with seas crashing over the stern threatening to wash him overboard, Seaman LARUE continuously helped to provide maneuvering instructions to the coxswain to enable him to keep the MLB alongside the people in the water and also off the jetty rocks. Three of the victims were brought onboard the MLB; however, the fourth person?s leg was caught in the wreckage of the capsized boat. Calmly and professionally, Seaman LARUE and two other MLB crew members freed the victim?s leg from the debris just as the distressed vessel sank. With all four survivors safely onboard, the MLB returned to Station Tillamook. Seaman LARU demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Harshfield, Richard A. [1st citation], Johnson, Robert W., Michael, William R., Smith, Stephen E., and Terrell, Bruce W.)


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LEISNER, Robert L., Jr., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 08 September 1981
Date of Award: 11 March 1982

Citation not on file.


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LEYDA, Earl H., Engineman, Third Class, USCGR

Date of Action: 18 August 1957
Date of Award: 18 March 1958

For heroism during the rescue operations following a violent explosion in the Oswego Water Works Tunnel, at Oswego, New York, on the evening of 18 August 1957. LEYDA volunteered with two other men to attempt the rescue of three construction workers trapped somewhere in the 6,200 foot tunnel under Lake Ontario. Other workers had made several rescue attempts but were forced to withdraw because of fumes, lack of oxygen, and the distance involved. With the aid of Coast Guard OBA equipment, LEYDA and two other members of the rescue party entered the gas filled tunnel. Loose rock, water seepage and toxic gas added to the hazards. LEYDA and the others had proceeded approximately 5,800 feet underground when they located the bodies of the victims, apparently killed by the explosion. LEYDA demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Johnson, Raymond A.)


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LIBAIRE, Jeffrey L., Captain, United States Air Force

Date of Action: 24 July 1984
Date of Award: 25 January 1985

Captain LIBAIRE is cited for heroism on the morning of 24 July 1984 when he rescued two survivors of a 68-foot fishing vessel aground in the surf in the Chandeleur Islands, Gulf of Mexico. Captain LIBAIRE, along with a crewman of Coast Guard helicopter HH-3F 1845, volunteered to go into the surf and rescue the two survivors stranded on the foundering vessel. His first two attempts were unsuccessful due to the six to eight foot seas and strong rip tide. On his third attempt, Captain LIBAIRE fought through the pounding waves and finally reached the stricken vessel. Too exhausted to pull himself onboard, Captain LIBAIRE held onto the gunwale while persuading the survivors, who were non-swimmers, to enter a life raft. As the second man reluctantly entered the raft a large wave hit, turning the raft on top of Captain LIBAIRE and throwing the two survivors into the water. Captain LIBAIRE righted the life raft, swam to the survivors, brought them to the raft, and instructed them to hold onto the sides. Captain LIBAIRE then, while pulling the raft, started swimming toward shore. After about ten feet another wave struck, separating the survivors from the life raft. Again, Captain LIBAIRE retrieved them and with encouragement directed them to hold onto the raft. Halfway to shore, Assistance in the person of the crewman arrived to help in pulling the survivors to safety. After nearly 90 minutes in the water, Captain LIBAIRE finally reached shore with the two survivors. Captain LIBAIRE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and extreme daring in spite of imminent danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United Sates Air Force and the United States Coast Guard.


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LORANGE, David M., Boatswain?s Mate Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 19 March 1979
Date of Award: 21 June 1979

Petty Officer LORANGE is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon of 19 March 1979 when he rescued a young boy from drowning in the turbulent surf at Agingan Point, Saipan, Northern Marianas Islands. The boy and a friend were fishing off the point when he was swept out to sea by the high surf. His young companion tossed a log out to the boy and ran for help. When advised of the accident, Petty Officer LORANGE and three shipmates from U.S. Coast Guard Loran Monitor Station Saipan immediately proceeded to the scene. Upon arrival, the boy was observed approximately 70-yards offshore, holding on to the log in an area locally known as ?Shark Alley.? With complete disregard for his own safety, Petty Officer LORANGE dove off the 10 to 12-foot cliff and swam through the 15-foot breaking surf and 10-foot swells to the helpless boy. Reaching the bleeding victim, Petty Officer LORANGE quickly calmed him down and towed him to the base of the cliff. The other Coast Guardsmen then tossed him a life ring with a line attached. While being pulled to safety, Petty Officer LORANGE maintained his hold on the boy while using his feet to fend off the side of the cliff. With the boy safely ashore, Petty Officer LORANGE, a trained EMT, assisted in treating the boy for shock and lacerations while enroute to the hospital. Petty Officer LORANGE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


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MacDONALD, Joseph R., Chief Boatswain's Mate, USCGR

Date of Action: 21 May 1994
Date of Award: 21 April 1995

Chief Petty Officer MACDONALD is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 21 May 1994 while serving as Station Belle Isle boat crewman aboard rigid-hull inflatable boat CG-214363. The crew was involved in the rescue attempt of two victims from a 21-foot pleasure boat which had capsized while underway in choppy conditions in the Detroit River. Five people from the vessel quickly reached the safety of another boat, while a 22-year-old woman and a 4-year-old boy were trapped underneath the vessel. Cries and pounding against the inside of the hull were audible to the crew of CG-214363. Chief Petty Officer MACDONALD, exposing himself to 58-degree water with no thermal protection for 25 minutes, desperately tried to reach up into the boat for the woman and child, first trying with just his arm and then with the help of an oar. Unsuccessful in this attempt, he exited the water to don an air tank and fins which he had requested from the Detroit Police Harbormaster. Disregarding his own safety, Chief Petty Officer MACDONALD reentered the water with no exposure suit in order to conserve time and reach the trapped victims as quickly as possible. Severely hampered by poor visibility and web of fishing lines and other debris obstructing his route to the forward cabin, he ultimately located and grasped the legs of the boy. With great strength and determination, he pulled the child from the cabin and to the surface, where he was immediately warmed and rushed to shore for medical attention. After for searching for the woman until he could no longer function due to hypothermia and spending 45 minutes in the frigid water, Chief Petty Officer MACDONALD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in the rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


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MACHOVEC, Kirk A., Aviation Survivalman First Class, USCG

Date of Action: 05 December 1993
Date of Award: 01 April 1994

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Beach, Eugene W., Montgomery, Tyrone M., and Rose, Christopher S. In addition, AE3 Thomas H. Parker, USCG, received the Air Medal and BM2 Michael D. Warner, USMC, received the Meritorious Service Medal with ?O? device for their roles in this rescue)


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MACLENNAN, Craig E., Boatswain?s Mate Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 25 May 1987
Date of Award: 05 August 1987

Petty Officer MACLENNAN is cited for extraordinary heroism on 25 May 1987 while assigned to USCGC POINT CARREW (WPB 82374). On that day, he was put aboard a sailing vessel which was disabled with a broken rudder in 10 to 15-foot seas. Demonstrating exceptional professionalism, he calmed the vessel?s skipper, then managed to rig a towing bridle and attach a towline, despite the vessel being thrashed about by heavy winds and violent seas. As the seas increased to 20 feet and winds gusted in excess of 30 knots, three drogue chutes, used to help stabilize the sailing vessel, were ripped loose. Courageously, Petty Officer MACLENNAN battled the torrent conditions and successfully deployed an empty P-140 pump can, which provided the needed stability. Finally, the POINT CARREW was able to tow the vessel to safety. Less than an hour later, despite extreme fatigue, POINT CARREW was called to assist a 22-foot vessel, stranded eight miles offshore with two adults and three children on board. Once again Petty Officer MACLENNAN was called upon to board the vessel. Once on board, he calmed the frightened occupants, then, heroically, held on to the pitching bow of the small vessel while retrieving a heaving line from the water and attaching a towline. He continued to calm the frightened victims and at the same time steered the tow to prevent it from capsizing. As the vessel was pulled closer to the POINT CARREW, it began to break up and take on water. Acting quickly and intelligently, Petty Officer MACLENNAN threw one child and then another over the rail, safely into the arms of a POINT CARREW crewmember. Then, without regard for his own personal safety, Petty Officer MACLENNAN lifted an inured adult to safety as the two vessels began to surge apart in the violent seas. Petty Officer MACLENNAN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during these rescues. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.
(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Fisch, Kenneth L. and Hohl, Clifford F.)


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MANNO, Lance, Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action: ??
Date of Award: 06 October 1993

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Richmond, Patrick)


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MARSHALL, William C., Chief Machinery Technician, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 13 March 1978
Date of Award: 31 July 1978

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Dolloff, James O.)


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McADAMS, Thomas David, Senior Chief Boatswain?s Mate, USCG

Date of Action: 26 May 1968
Date of Award: 15 August 1968

For heroism on the morning of May 26, 1968 while serving as crew member of the Motor Life Boat CG-44303, engaged in the perilous rescue of one survivor and the subsequent search for three other persons from the capsized pleasure craft YUM-YUM at Umpqua River Entrance, Winchester Bay, Oregon. Despite 35-knot winds and rough seas with 12- to 15-foot breakers, which broke up the pleasure craft YUM-YUM, Chief Petty Officer McADAMS proceeded to the vicinity of the bow section sighted in the surf. When one man was seen repeatedly going under the surface about 75 feet away from the bow section, Chief Petty Officer McADAMS skillfully maneuvered the CG-44303 alongside the victim, who disappeared under the port side, as the surf broke over the decks of the rescue boat. Leaving the wheel, and with the boat being carried broadside into the surf, he then assisted in pulling the survivor to safety. Commencing a search pattern for the other three persons who were missing from the demolished craft, Chief Petty Officer McADAMS maneuvered the CG-44303 in breaking swells for approximately 30 minutes, grounding once, frequently rolling broadside and repeatedly being engulfed by the surf while recovering two other victims. He then proceeded to shore and delivered the victims to medical authorities. The CG-44303 later returned to the scene and searched in vain for the fourth man. Chief Petty Officer McADAMS demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Friday, Robert G. and Rector, James H.)

Click here to read Senior Chief McAdams' 1958 Gold Lifesaving Medal Citation

Click here to see a photograph of Senior Chief McAdams


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McCHESNEY, Charles P., Boatswain?s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 08 August 1980
Date of Award: 20 November 1980

Petty Officer McCHESNEY is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 8 August 1980 while engaged in the rescue of a young man who was trapped on the face of a 500-foot cliff near Cascade Head, Oregon. Responding to a request for assistance from the Oregon State Police and the Depoe Bay Fire Department, Petty Officer McCHESNEY proceeded from Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay to a location some two miles from the cliff. Then, along with other rescue personnel, he carried necessary rescue equipment over the rugged terrain to the site of the incident. Upon arrival, Petty Officer McCHESNEY immediately assessed the situation, donned rappelling gear and, although lacking any formal training in rappelling, proceeded cautiously across the steep cliff toward the stranded victim who was suspended precariously with both hands and one foot jammed into rocks and one leg dangling. Without regard to his own personal safety, Petty Officer McCHESNEY lowered a rappelling harness on his own safety line to the struggling and excited youth. Just as Petty Officer McCHESNEY finished instructing the man on how to don the harness and attach the safety line, the young man slipped and fell some 15 feet before being restrained by the line. Rescuers on top of the cliff then hoisted the youth to safety and the safety line was passed back down to Petty Officer McCHESNEY for his return to the cliff top. Petty Officer McCHESNEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


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McCOY, Richard H., Aviation Electrician's Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: ??
Date of Award: 02 November 1967

Citation not on file.


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McDONALD, Daniel C., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 11 September 1989
Date of Award: 26 July 1990

Seaman McDONALD is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 11 September 1989 while serving as rescue swimmer aboard Coast Guard Surf Utility Boat (UTB) 41360 during the rescue of seven survivors from the pleasure boat NONNIE?S PAPA. The vessel had capsized in 10 to 15-foot surf while entering Barnegat Inlet. Informed that a victim was trapped in the cabin of the overturned vessel, Seaman McDONALD disregarded his own safety to swim through the raging surf and sound the hull as it drifted toward a shoal. When the UTB was forced to break off and seaman McDONALD?s tending line ran out, he courageously cut the line rather than abandon the victim he believed to be trapped inside. When he was thrown from the hull by a rogue wave, he skillfully fought his way through the crashing waves to a nearby surf rescue boat which then supported the fire department rescue divers who had arrived on scene. When a diver became entangled in the wreckage, Seaman McDONALD, undaunted by his own recent ordeal, reentered the roiling seas and helped free the trapped diver. Seaman McDonald demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Endicott, Keith L. A Gold Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Robert J. Gilrain, a civilian, and a Silver Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Seaman Kevin S. Shurtleff, USCG, for their respective roles in this rescue).


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McDOUGLE, Cameron E., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action: 12-14 November 1981
Date of Award: 11 March 1982

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Brereton, Richard J. and Davis, George T.)


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McGUFFIN, Gary R., Lieutenant, Junior Grade, USCG

Date of Action: 31 March 1973
Date of Award: 19 July 1973

Citation not on file.


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McGUIRE, John K., Aviation Machinist's Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 05 November 1976
Date of Award: 11 July 1977

Citation not on file.


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McINTOSH, Robert W., Boatswain's Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 04 April 1988
Date of Award: 03 February 1989

Citation not on file.


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MERRIAM, Jamison, Fireman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 22 August 1994
Date of Award: 21 December 1994

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Beatty, Lawrence and Duffy, James)


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MICHAEL, William R., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 04 July 1980
Date of Award: 02 February 1981

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Harshfield, Richard A. [1st award], Johnson, Robert W., Larue, Joe S., Smith, Stephen R., and Terrell, Bruce W.)


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MILLER, Gregory E., Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 03 December 1989
Date of Award: 12 March 1990

Petty Officer MILLER is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 3 December 1989 while rescuing a victim who had been swept off the top of Crescent City Harbor Outer Breakwater onto the rocks below by 18-foot swells breaking over the jetty. Overhearing a transmission for assistance, Petty Officer MILLER and a fellow crewmember proceeded to the scene in a 19-foot rigid-hull-inflatable smallboat dispatched from USCGC EDISTO (WPB 1313). Arriving on scene, the crew spotted the injured victim trapped and clinging desperately to the rocks halfway down the inside of the jetty. The smallboat could approach no closer than 25 feet without being swamped by waves rolling into the harbor or risking almost certain capsizing from the 6-foot waves breaking on the jetty. Petty Officer MILLER dove into the treacherous water and swam to the jetty. Water engulfed him with each breaking wave as he climbed up over the rocks. Upon reaching the stranded victim, Petty Officer MILLER shielded him from the constant pounding of the surf and repeatedly pulled him up from between the rocks. Suffering from severe trauma and hypothermia, the victim?s will to survive appeared to fade. Undaunted, Petty Officer MILLER continually provided encouragement, reassuring him that he would soon be safe. When there was a lull in the waves, Petty Officer MILLER helped the injured man off the jetty and pulled him to the smallboat where he was taken aboard and returned to shore and safety. Petty Officer MILLER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


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MILLER, John S., Chief Warrant Officer, USCG

Date of Action: 28 January 1980
Date of Award: 28 April 1980

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Rhodes, Michael and Flores, William R.)


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MINCEY, Glenn H., Boatswain?s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 29 March 1983
Date of Award: 10 November 1983

Petty Officer MINCEY is cited for heroism on the night of 29 March 1983 while serving as coxswain of Coast Guard Utility Boat 41483 and as Petty Officer-in-Charge of Search and Rescue Mobile Unit Number Two, Coast Guard Base Galveston, Texas, when he rescued four persons from S/V PEGASUS, aground on the rocks on a turbulent five-foot surf off Galveston?s south jetty. Underway on CG-41483, Petty Officer MINCEY exhibited superior composure and professional judgment by maintaining radio contact with the PEGASUS and keeping the panic-stricken crew calm while extracting sufficient information to find the distressed vessel. Arriving on-scene and discovering he was unable to maneuver CG-41483 to assist, he recommended the dispatch of Search and Rescue Mobile Unit Number One to attempt the rescue from the jetty. Petty Officer MINCEY then returned CG-41483 to Base Galveston, took charge of Search and Rescue Mobile Unit Number Two, and returned to the scene by land. With the waves breaking over the jetty, Mobile Unit One had succeeded only in securing two lines to the foundering vessel. The radical movement of PEGASUS, which was being lifted by the waves and grounded alternately on her port and starboard sides, precluded rescue by the helicopter on scene. Petty Officer MINCEY, without hesitation, and at great personal risk, pulled himself along the lines rigged to the PEGASUS in a small life raft. At PEGASUS he took a five-year old child and encouraged the parents to follow his example. With his coaching they did so, and safely reached the jetty. Petty Officer MINCEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


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MINIKEN, Clinton P., Seaman, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action: 12 February 1997
Date of Award: 18 February 1997

Seaman MINIKEN is cited for extraordinary heroism on 12 February 1997 while serving as a crew member aboard Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat CG-44363, attached to Coast Guard Station Quillayute River. Shortly before 1 o?clock in the morning, responding to a distress call from the sailing vessel GALE RUNNER, Station Quillayute River launched two rescue boats. The operator of GALE RUNNER reported that the vessel was dismasted, taking on water, and in danger of sinking, 2 miles south of the Quillayute River entrance. Seas of up to 25 feet, combined with high winds and driving rain, created a situation of imminent danger for the two people aboard the GALE RUNNER. Soon after crossing the treacherous bar in an attempt to reach the stricken sailboat, the motor lifeboat suddenly rolled over several times in the surf and confused seas. As a result of the repeated roll-overs, Seaman MINIKEN was forcibly separated from his rescue craft and thrown into the churning ocean. A Coast Guard HH-65 helicopter from Air Station Port Angeles was able to hoist to safety the two people from the GALE RUNNER as it crashed onto rocks. As a crew member of Coast Guard 44363, Seaman MINIKEN willingly entered extreme ocean storm conditions and sacrificed his life while attempting to save the lives of the two people from the GALE RUNNER. Seaman MINIKEN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Bosley, David A., Schlimme, Matthew E., and Wingo, Benjamin F. As a result of their actions in this incident, the following individuals received the Distinguished Flying Cross: AM3 Neal W. Amos, CDR Paul A. Langlois, and CDR Raymond J. Miller)


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MOLINA, Carlos Valdivia, Boatswain?s Mate First Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 21 October 1970
Date of Award: 21 July 1971

Petty Officer Molina is cited for heroism on the night of 21 October 1970 while serving as a crew member in USCGC ACUSHNET, [WMEC-167] engaged in the perilous rescue of a fellow shipmate who had been washed overboard into the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. Though darkness, high winds and 12-foot seas severely affected the search, the victim was sighted only minutes after the accident with the ship?s searchlight. Petty Officer MOLINA donned his wet suit while enroute to the boat lowering detail and volunteered as coxswain of the recovery boat. While the boat was almost lost in launching because of adverse weather conditions, Petty Officer MOLINA, realizing the plight of his shipmate, vaulted over the ship?s railing into the boat. Although suffering a serious fracture to his right leg, he started the motor and skillfully maneuvered the boat within 15 feet of his shipmate. A large wave then crested over the boat and disabled the motor. Disregarding his injuries, Petty Officer MOLINA began using the boat?s paddles in his continuing efforts to reach the man who was trying to swim toward him. Moments later another boat from the ACUSHNET arrived on scene and rescued both men. Petty Officer MOLINA, by his rescue efforts, demonstrated unusual initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of imminent personal danger throughout the operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


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MONTGOMERY, Tyrone M., Fireman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action: 05 December 1993
Date of Award: 01 April 1994

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Beach, Eugene W., Machovec, Kirk A., and Rose, Christopher S. In addition, AE3 Thomas H. Parker, USCG, received the Air Medal and BM2 Michael D. Warner, USCG, received the Meritorious Service Medal with ?O? device for their roles in this rescue)


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MOORE, Ronald L., Chief Warrant Officer, USCG

Date of Action: ? October 1994
Date of Award: 25 January 1995

Citation not on file.


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MOSELY, Adam W., Aviation Survivalman Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 16 January 1992
Date of Award: 04 June 1992

Citation not on file.


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MOUNTS, James A., Fireman, USCG

Date of Action: 11 March 1990
Date of Award: 16 May 1990

Fireman MOUNTS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 11 March 1990 when he rescued a man and assisted a badly injured woman stranded on the north jetty at the entrance of Humboldt Bay. Fireman MOUNTS was alerted by Coast Guard Station Humboldt Bay personnel that there were several injured people on the jetty. Fireman MOUNTS, who was off duty at the time, immediately rushed to the scene and, upon his arrival, found a man with a broken leg clinging to a light tower, and a woman with a severely lacerated face. He directed two other persons who had accompanied him to escort the injured woman to safety. Fireman MOUNTS then turned to the injured man and began to splint his leg. After a few moments, he was struck by a large wave and was knocked off balance. Realizing his precarious position, Fireman MOUNTS radioed for more equipment and air support. Suddenly, the injured man saw a large wave approaching and warned Fireman MOUNTS who immediately threw himself over the injured man to protect him from the force of the wave. A 12-foot wave struck, sweeping Fireman MOUNTS across the jetty and into a barrier 20 feet below. He was knocked unconscious and sustained several severe lacerations. As he was recovered by another Coast Guardsman, Fireman MOUNTS regained consciousness and again turned to the injured man to continue treating his wounds until a rescue helicopter arrived. Fireman MOUNTS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest tradition of the United States Coast Guard.


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MUNOZ, Mario L., Aviation Electrician?s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 24 March 1978
Date of Award: 01 April 1979

Petty Officer MUNOZ is cited for heroism on the morning of 24 March 1978 when he rescued a fellow Coast Guardsman from drowning following a helicopter crash in the Atlantic Ocean 15-miles east of Cat Island. Serving as an aircrewman on Coast Guard HH-52A 1412 deployed onboard USCGC STEADFAST (WMEC 623) when the helicopter rolled off the flight deck during take-off and fell into the water, Petty Officer MUNOZ found himself trapped inside the aircraft. Realizing that the aircraft had entered the water upside-down, and believing that it was sinking, Petty Officer MUNOZ quickly released his seat belt and without hesitation located another crewman struggling to free himself. Ensuring that the crewman was released from both his gunner?s and seat belts, Petty Officer MUNOZ mustered his strength and physically pushed the man out the cabin door to safety. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Petty Officer MUNOZ then tried to reach the cockpit crew to provide assistance. While feeling his way forward, he was temporarily snagged and realized that he was still attached to the helicopter by his gunner?s belt. Managing to release the buckle and now desperately needing air, Petty Officer MUNOZ found a small pocket of air, only to receive mouthfuls of sea water mixed with jet fuel. Finally, instinctively knowing that he had few precious seconds of air left, Petty Officer MUNOZ felt his way out of the cabin to safety. Reaching the surface he saw that the entire crew was safely out of the helicopter and that a motor surfboat from the STEADFAST was on scene. Petty Officer MUNOZ demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


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MURPHY, Dana R., Gunner?s Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action: 12 March 1981
Date of Award: 09 June 1981

Petty Officer MURPHY is cited for heroism on the early morning of 12 March 1981 when he rescued a man from drowning. While standing quarterdeck watch on board USCGC CHEROKEE [WMEC-165] which was moored at Pier 19 North, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base, Norfolk, Virginia, Petty Officer MURPHY observed a man walking unsteadily down the pier. When the man came too close to one side of the pier and fell into the water, Petty Officer MURPHY immediately piped the security watchstander to the quarterdeck and ran to the spot where the man had disappeared. Peering through the darkness into the dark water, Petty Officer MURPHY saw the apparently unconscious man floating slightly beneath the surface. Shouting to the security watchstander to bring a life ring, Petty Officer MURPHY then dived into the 44-degree water to attempt a rescue. Fighting off the shock of the frigid water, Petty Officer MURPHY swam to the helpless man and towed him over 50 yards to the boat ramp at the end of the dock where two fellow Coast Guardsmen helped them from the water. Petty Officer MURPHY then instructed his two shipmates to call the base ambulance and get blankets. After they left, the victim began to choke and became unable to breathe. Petty Officer MURPHY quickly applied the Heimlich Maneuver to clear the air passage, enabling the man to breathe on his own. Concerned about the 28-degree wind chill factor on the victim, Petty Officer MURPHY began to carry the man back toward the CHEROKEE. As the other crewmen returned, the victim was taken to the CHEROKEE?s mess deck and wrapped in blankets. Petty Officer MURPHY then returned to the quarterdeck to insure an ambulance was on the way. Only after the victim was on the way to the hospital did Petty Officer MURPHY seek medical help for his exposure to the cold war and air. Petty Officer MURPHY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

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1944: Representatives from the United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and China meet in the Dumbarton Oaks estate at Georgetown, Washington, D.C., to formulate the formal principles of an organization that will provide collective security on a worldwide basis-an organization that will become the United Nations.