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Military Quotes

War is the remedy that our enemies have chosen, and I say let us give them all they want.

-- General William T. Sherman

Commodore William D. Porter, USN (1808-1864)

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William David Porter, son of Commodore David Porter and elder brother of Admiral David Dixon Porter, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana on 10 March 1808. He entered the Navy as a Midshipman in January 1823 and attained the rank of Lieutenant at the end of 1833. He was retired in September 1855, but was later reinstated on active duty with the rank of Commander. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, he was commanding the sloop of war USS Saint Mary's.

Late in 1861, Porter took command of the newly-converted gunboat New Era, serving in the Mississippi River area with the Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. He renamed her Essex, after his father's old ship of the War of 1812. During late 1861 and early 1862, he had Essex further modified and took her into action on a number of occasions, distinguishing himself for his courageous conduct. After the gunboat was damaged in action with Fort Henry, Tennessee, in February 1862, Porter had the ship virtually rebuilt. He then commanded her in further combat undertakings, including the destruction of the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. A controversial figure in the Navy, Porter received the rank of Commodore in recognition of his achievements, but was detached from Essex in September 1862 and had no further assignments afloat. He died on 1 May 1864.

USS William D. Porter (DD-579), 1943-1945, was named in honor of Commodore Porter.

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This Day in History
1864: General William T. Sherman launches the attack that finally secures Atlanta, Georgia, for the Union, and seals the fate of Confederate General John Bell Hood's army, which is forced to evacuate the area.



1914: The Battle of the Grande Couronne of Nancy begins.

1917: German troops force the British to evacuate advanced posts north of St. Julien-Poelcapelle road.

1918: Australian troops capture Mont St. Quentin.

1942: The British army under General Bernard Law Montgomery defeats Field Marshal Erwin Rommels Afrika Korps in the Battle of Alam Halfa in Egypt.

1944: The British 8th Army breaks through the Germans "Gothic Line," a defensive line drawn across northern Italy.

1950: Far East Air Force B-29s completed air strikes on the docks and railway yards at Songjin and the industrial factory at Chinnampo. From August 28-31, aircraft dropped 326 tons of bombs on Songjin and 284 tons on Chinnampo.

1950: The second battle of the Naktong Bulge began as the North Korean I Corps crossed the lower Naktong River in a well-planned attack against the U.S. 2nd and 25th Infantry Divisions.

1951: The last United Nations Command offensive of the war occurred when the 1st Marine Division began its assault against the Punchbowl from August 31 to September 3. The four-day battle resulted in 2,700 Marine casualties.

1961: A concrete wall replaces the barbed wire fence that separates East and West Germany, it will be called the Berlin wall.