Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, USN, (1812-1897)

(303 total words in this text)
(593 Reads)  Printer-friendly page
Samuel Phillips Lee was born in Fairfax County, Virginia, on 13 February 1812. He was appointed a Midshipman in the U.S. Navy in November 1825 and subsequently saw extensive service at sea, including combat action during the Mexican War and exploration, surveying and oceanographic duty. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, he was captain of the sloop of war Vandalia in the East Indies, sailing her home on his own initiative to join the blockade of the Southern coast. Commander Lee commanded the new steam sloop USS Oneida during the New Orleans campaign and subsequent operations on the Mississippi River in the first half of 1862.

In September 1862, S.P. Lee was placed in command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron with the rank of Acting Rear Admiral. He led this force for over two years, during which it was responsible for the blockade of the North Carolina coast and operations on North Carolina and Virginia inland waters, all areas of very active combat between Union and Confederate forces. Acting Rear Admiral Lee transferred to the command of the Mississippi Squadron in October 1864 and led it to the end of the Civil War in 1865.

Reverting to his permanent rank of Captain after the Civil War, Lee had extensive service in the Washington, D.C., area. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in 1870 and retired from active service in February 1873. Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee died at Silver Spring, Maryland, on 7 June 1897.

Two U.S. Navy ships have been named in honor of Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, including: USS S.P. Lee (DD-310), which was commissioned in October 1920 and lost by stranding in September 1923, and USNS S.P. Lee (T-AGS-31, later T-AG-192), which was in naval service between 1968 and 1974.

Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Should the guards involved with the Abu Ghraib prison be punished?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 117

This Day in History
1759: British forces seize Basse-Terre and Guadeloupe from France.

1865: Union cavalry units continue to skirmish with Confederate forces in Henderson, North Carolina and Munsford Station, Alalbama.

1924: The U.S. Senate passes the Soldiers Bonus Bill.

1942: In retaliation for the British raid on Lubeck, German bombers strike Exeter and later Bath, Norwick, York, and other "medieval-city centres." Almost 1,000 English civilians are killed in the bombing attacks nicknamed "Baedeker Raids."

1945: The Soviet Army fights its way into Berlin.

1950: Chiang Kai-shek evacuates Hainan, leaving mainland China to Mao Zedong and the communists.

1975: At a speech at Tulane University, President Gerald Ford says the Vietnam War is finished as far as America is concerned. This was devastating news to the South Vietnamese, who were desperately pleading for U.S. support as the North Vietnamese surrounded Saigon for the final assault on the capital city.