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Military Quotes

It is not big armies that win battles, it is the good ones!

-- Marshal Maurice de Saxe

Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, USN, (1812-1897)

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Samuel Phillips Lee was born in Fairfax County, Virginia, on 13 February 1812. He was appointed a Midshipman in the U.S. Navy in November 1825 and subsequently saw extensive service at sea, including combat action during the Mexican War and exploration, surveying and oceanographic duty. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, he was captain of the sloop of war Vandalia in the East Indies, sailing her home on his own initiative to join the blockade of the Southern coast. Commander Lee commanded the new steam sloop USS Oneida during the New Orleans campaign and subsequent operations on the Mississippi River in the first half of 1862.

In September 1862, S.P. Lee was placed in command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron with the rank of Acting Rear Admiral. He led this force for over two years, during which it was responsible for the blockade of the North Carolina coast and operations on North Carolina and Virginia inland waters, all areas of very active combat between Union and Confederate forces. Acting Rear Admiral Lee transferred to the command of the Mississippi Squadron in October 1864 and led it to the end of the Civil War in 1865.

Reverting to his permanent rank of Captain after the Civil War, Lee had extensive service in the Washington, D.C., area. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in 1870 and retired from active service in February 1873. Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee died at Silver Spring, Maryland, on 7 June 1897.

Two U.S. Navy ships have been named in honor of Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, including: USS S.P. Lee (DD-310), which was commissioned in October 1920 and lost by stranding in September 1923, and USNS S.P. Lee (T-AGS-31, later T-AG-192), which was in naval service between 1968 and 1974.

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This Day in History
1863: The first wartime conscription law goes into effect in the United States.

1865: Confederate General Robert E. Lees supply line into Petersburg, Virginia, is closed when Union forces under General Ulysses S. Grant collapse the end of Lees lines around Petersburg.

1918: The Royal Air Force (RAF) is formed with the amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS).

1945: After suffering the loss of 116 planes and damage to three aircraft carriers, 50,000 U.S. combat troops of the 10th Army, under the command of Lieutenant General Simon B. Buckner Jr., land on the southwest coast of the Japanese island of Okinawa, 350 miles south of Kyushu, the southern main island of Japan.

1948: Soviet troops stop U.S. and British military trains traveling through the Russian zone of occupation in Germany and demand that they be allowed to search the trains.

1968: The U.S. Army launches Operation Pegasus, the reopening of a land route to the besieged Khe Sanh Marine base.

1972: Following three days of the heaviest artillery and rocket bombardment of the war soldiers of Hanois 304th Division sweep across the Demilitarized Zone.