Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Online
There are 82 users online

You can register for a user account here.
Library of Congress

Military Quotes

In war the will is directed at an animate object that reacts.

-- Karl von Clausewitz

USS Tecumseh (1864-1864)

(215 total words in this text)
(365 Reads)  Printer-friendly page
USS Tecumseh, a 2100-ton Canonicus class monitor built at Jersey City, New Jersey, was commissioned in April 1864. She served on the James River, Virginia, during May-July 1864, supporting the operations of the Union army. While so occupied on 21 June, she took part in a gunfire action with Confederate fortifications and warships at Howlett's Farm.

Tecumseh was sent to join Rear Admiral Farragut's West Gulf Blockading Squadron in July 1864, in order to participate in an attack on Mobile Bay, Alabama. In the morning of 5 August, she steamed slowly past Fort Morgan, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, leading a line of four monitors that were to cover the advance of the rest of the attacking squadron. While maneuvering to engage the Confederate ironclad ram Tennessee, Tecumseh struck an enemy mine, quickly rolled over and sank, with the loss of 92 of her crew.

During the mid-1960s, plans were made to raise the sunken monitor and place her on exhibit. Though Tecumseh's hull was partially explored and many small objects were recovered from her interior technical, legal and financial difficulties prevented full salvage. Upside down in relatively shallow water, she remains the best-preserved Civil War ironclad that is available to serve as an artifact of that great American conflict.

Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Which country poses the greatest terror threat to the United States?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 144

This Day in History
1747: The French capture Bergen op Zoom, consolidating their occupation of Austrian Flanders in the Netherlands.

1810: Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest, launches the Mexican War of Independence with the issuing of his Grito de Dolores, or "Cry of Dolores," The revolutionary tract, so-named because it was publicly read by Hidalgo in the town of Dolores, called for the end of 300 years of Spanish rule in Mexico, redistribution of land, and racial equality.

1864: Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest leads 4,500 men out of Verona, Miss. to harass Union outposts in northern Alabama and Tennessee.

1940: The Burke-Wadsworth Act is passed by Congress, by wide margins in both houses, and the first peacetime draft in the history of the United States is imposed. Selective Service was born.


1942: The Japanese base at Kiska in the Aleutian Islands is raided by American bombers.

1944: The invasion of Peleliu, of the Palau Islands, begins after carrier aircraft bombing and ship bombardment.

1945: Japan surrenders Hong Kong to Britain.

1950: The U.S. 8th Army breaks out of the Pusan Perimeter in South Korea and begins heading north to meet MacArthurs troops heading south from Inchon.

1969: President Richard Nixon announces the second round of U.S. troop withdrawals from Vietnam. The first round of withdrawals was completed in August and totaled 25,000 troops (including two brigades of the 9th Infantry Division). There would be 15 announced withdrawals in total, leaving only 27,000 U.S. troops in Vietnam by November 1972.

1972: South Vietnamese troops recapture Quang Tri province in South Vietnam from the North Vietnamese Army.