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Sometimes it is entirely appropriate to kill a fly with a sledge hammer.

-- Major Holdridge

79th Field Artillery

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Constituted 1 July 1916 in the Regular Army as the 21st Cavalry

Organized 1 June 1917 at Fort Riley, Kansas

Converted and redesignated 1 November 1917 as the 79th Field Artillery

Assigned 6 December 1917 to the 7th Division

Inactivated 14 September 1921 at Camp George G. Meade, Maryland, and relieved from assignment to the 7th Division

Assigned 1 January 1930 to the 7th Division

Relieved 16 October 1939 from assignment to the 7th Division

(1st Battalion activated 1 June 1940 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina)

Regiment (less 1st Battalion) activated 1 June 1941 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Regiment broken up 23 February 1943 and its elements reorganized and redesignated as follows:

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 79th Field Artillery Group

1st Battalion as the 697th Field Artillery Battalion

2d Battalion as the 698th Field Artillery Battalion

After 23 February 1943 the above units underwent changes as follows:

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 79th Field Artillery Group, inactivated 30 June 1946 in Germany

697th Field Artillery Battalion inactivated 12 February 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
Redesignated 5 February 1947 as the 555th Field Artillery Battalion
Activated 1 January 1949 in Korea
Assigned 10 October 1954 to the 71st Infantry Division
Inactivated 15 September 1956 at Fort Lewis, Washington
Relieved 16 July 1957 from assignment to the 71st Infantry Division

698th Field Artillery Battalion inactivated 14 February 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
Redesignated 5 February 1947 as the 567th Field Artillery Battalion
Activated 20 March 1951 at Camp Polk, Louisiana
Inactivated 16 January 1956 in Germany

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 79th Field Artillery Group, and the 555th and 567th Field Artillery Battalions consolidated, reorganized, and redesignated 16 July 1957 as the 79th Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System

Redesignated 1 September 1971 as the 79th Field Artillery

Withdrawn 16 August 1995 from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System; concurrently assigned to the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command

79th Field Artillery Honors

Campaign Participation Credit

World War I: Streamer without inscription

World War II: Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; North Apennines; Normandy; Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe

Korean War: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953

Vietnam: Counteroffensive, Phase VII; Consolidation I; Consolidation II; Cease-Fire

Decorations

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for LONG BINH

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