Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Bolt-Action Rifles

(197 total words in this text)
(1323 Reads)  Printer-friendly page
Nearly all infantryman in the First World War used bolt action rifles. This type of rifle had been invented by a Scottish immigrant to the United States, James Paris Lee. The bolt is the device that closes the breech of the barrel. The bolt-action rifle had a metal box, into which cartridges were placed on top of a spring. As the bolt was opened, the spring forced the cartridges up against a stop; the bolt pushed the top cartridge into the chamber as it closed. After firing, the opening of the bolt extracted the empty cartridge case, and the return stroke loaded a fresh round.

Cartridges were injected into the magazine by means of a clip. They consisted of open-ended slides or cases within which a number of cartridges, 3, 5 or 6 were gripped by the spring metal of the case or a spring incorporated in the base.

The Lee-Enfield was the main rifle used by the British Army during the First World War. Other popular bolt action rifles included the Mauser Gewehr (Germany), Lebel (France), Mannlicher-Carcano (Italy), Springfield (United States), Moisin-Nagant (Russia), Mannlicher M95 (Austria) and Arisaka (Japan).


Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Have U.S. military allies significantly contributed to the war effort?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 228

This Day in History
1699: The Treaty of Karlowitz ends the war between Austria and the Turks.

1863: General Joseph Hooker assumes command of the Army of the Potomac following Ambrose Burnside.

1942: American Expeditionary Force lands in Northern Ireland.

1943: The first OSS (Office of Strategic Services) agent parachutes behind Japanese lines in Burma.

1945: Soviet troops enter Auschwitz, Poland, freeing the survivors of the network of concentration camps. Auschwitz was a group of camps, designated I, II, and III. There were also 40 smaller "satellite" camps.

1945: The most decorated soldier of WWII, American Lt. Audie Murphy, is wounded in France. Perhaps as interesting as his service record and later film career was his public admission that he suffered severe depression from post traumatic stress syndrome, also called battle fatigue, and became addicted to sleeping pills as a result. This had long been a taboo subject for veterans.

1951: U.S. warships bombarded Inchon for the second time during the war. The first was during the initial allied invasion, Sept. 15, 1950.

1953: Surface ships blasted coastal targets as the USS Missouri completed a 46-hour bombardment of Songjin.

1953: The last F4U Corsair rolled off the Chance Vought Aircraft Company production line. Despite the dawning of the jet age, this World War II fighter remained in production due to its vital close-air support role in the Korean War. Almost 12,000 Corsairs were produced in various models.

1970: U.S. Navy Lt. Everett Alvarez Jr. spends his 2,000th day in captivity in Southeast Asia. First taken prisoner when his plane was shot down on August 5, 1964, he became the longest-held confirmed POW in U.S. history. Alvarez was released in 1973 after spending over eight years in captivity.