Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Online
There are 103 users online

You can register for a user account here.
Library of Congress

Military Quotes

Discipline is simply the art of making the soldiers fear their officers more than the enemy.

-- Helvetius

Furtive Bear, Peru

(460 total words in this text)
(1867 Reads)  Printer-friendly page
Furtive Bear

Operation FURTIVE BEAR included activities to secretly photograph cocaine labs and airstrips in Peru's Upper Huallaga Valley. The FURTIVE BEAR nomenclature was also applied to the 430th Reconnaissance Technical Group which deployed in Operation JUST CAUSE. On 24 April 1992, an unarmed C-130H Hercules from the 310th Airlift Squadron was deployed on a FURTIVE BEAR mission. Two Peruvian Air Force SU-22 (FITTER) aircraft reacted to the C-130H some 70 miles off the coast of Peru, in international airspace. The clearly marked transport was was raked with cannon fire 60 miles off the Pacific coast by the two Peruvian SU-22 fighters, and forced to land in Peru.

Six of the 14-man crew aboard the C-130H became casualties. Master Sgt. Joseph C. Beard, Jr., immediately went to an observation window in the right paratroop door and called out fighter positions to the pilot. This was not part of his job but he did it anyway. When the lead fighter opened fire on the plane he called it out to the pilot and pushed another crewmember away from the window. The 30mm cannon fire struck the window Beard was stationed in and he was sucked out of the plane during the rapid decompression at 18,500 feet. An exhaustive search and rescue never recovered his body. Staff Sgt. Ronald Hetzel had his chest blown open and his jugular vein severed. Four other airmen also were wounded. Beard received a posthumous Distinguished Flying Cross at his memorial service. The crew received the Mackay trophy for the Air Force's most meritorious flight of 1992. Purple Hearts, however, were not announced for the wounded crew until January 1996.

The Peruvian pilots later were awarded commendations from their government for their actions. Peru claimed that the American aircraft had refused to respond to Peruvian Air Force radio communications before being attacked. The United States Congress held up $100 million in assistance in 1994 until Peru settled damage claims with Beard's family.

Aerial detection and monitoring form the mainstay of interdiction in South America. Early warning, tracking, imagery, signals intelligence and ground-based radar all contribute to the "end game," or actual capture of a place smuggling narcotics. An array of aircraft was dedicated to interdiction. These included E-3 Sentry AWACs, C-130 Hercules and P-3 Orions.

Until the base closed, the 24th Wing, based at Howard Air Base near Panama City, handled daily flights. Some 80 percent of them are counter-drug related. Air National Guard and Reserve units provide 40 percent of the overall crews, dominating airlift. To coordinate detection and monitoring of narco-aircraft, the Wing operated the Joint Air Operations Center at Howard. Opened in August 1992, this nerve cell was the direct result of the tragic shoot-down of a U.S. plane by Peruvian pilots the previous April.
Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Should the don't ask, don't tell policy be repealed?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 70

This Day in History
1664: After days of negotiation, the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam surrendered to the British, who would rename it New York.

1776: Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers.

1781: The British fleet arrived off the Virginia Capes and found 26 French warships in three straggling lines. Rear Adm. Thomas Graves waited for the French to form their battle lines and then fought for 5 days.

1813: USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off Portland, ME.

1863: United States Foreign Minister to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, sends an angry letter to the British government warning that war between the two nations may erupt if it allows two powerful ironclad ships, designed to help the Confederates break the Union naval blockade, to set sail.

1877: Oglala Sioux chief Crazy Horse is fatally bayoneted by a U.S. soldier after resisting confinement in a guardhouse at Fort Robinson, Nebraska. A year earlier, Crazy Horse was among the Sioux leaders who defeated George Armstrong Custer's Seventh Cavalry at the Battle of Little Bighorn in Montana Territory.

1905: The Russo-Japanese War comes to an end as representatives of the two nations sign the Treaty of Portsmouth in New Hampshire.

1918: USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off France.

1939: The United States proclaimed its neutrality in World War II. President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders the Navy and Coast Guard to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of the eastern United States.

1942: British and US bombed Le Havre & Bremen.