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Military Quotes

On the fields of friendly strife are sown the seed that on other days and other fields will bear the fruits of victory.

-- General Douglas MacArthur

Col. Jonathan Eddy

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"Seldom is defeat accmpanied with such painful circumstances. Those who had houses in the vicinity soon saw them in flames and their families in the depths of distress. No other alternatives remained to the assailants than to surrender or flee the province. If caught, their fate might be that of traitors or rebels; therefore they left their families and took their route along the north shore, across the river St. John at Frederickton, and thence to Machias. Here they sucessfully arrived, half naked, and famished, having been in the woods twenty-five days. Their families who remained through a winter of extreme suffering were brought away in the spring under a flag of truce. Eddy and his associates dared not return to Nova Scotia for at the Council held at Halifax on the 17 of Nov. 1776 certain intelligence was presented to the effect that, "Johnathan Eddy, William Howe and Samuel Rogers have been to the utmost of their ability exciting and stirring up rebellion among the people of the County of Cumberland and are actually before the fort at Cumberland with a considerable number of rebels from New England and some Acadians and Indians."

It was therefore resolved to offer 200 pounds as a reward for apprehension of Johnathan Eddy, and 100 pounds for taking each of the others so that they be brought to justice.

Eddy then entered the Continental Army. He was at Machias on Aug. 12, 1777 when it was attacked by the British; some historians claim that it was Col. Eddy who led the {counter} attack"..."and is so stated on the official reports of the incident."

At the close of the war Col. Eddy and nineteen of his associates were awarded a grant of something over 9,000 acres of land on the east bank of the Penobscot in appreciation of their services during the American Revolution.

In August, 1784 Col. Eddy and his family removed from their Mass. home to township No. 10, east side of the Penobscot River, at the head of the tide. The township was later known as Eddytown Plantation and still later incorporated as the Town of Eddington, 1811 - in honor of Col. Eddy.

...In 1785 he bought the first vessel ever owned on the Penobscot River, the Schooner Blackbird. Her register signed by John Hancock, Gov. of Mass., says she was built at Beverly, 1780 and sold by Peter Coffin, Jr. of Gloucester, later bought by Col. Eddy....

He was the first magistrate on the Penobscot River. He was appointed by Gov. Hancock "A Special Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, A Register of Probate and Wills and a Justice of the Peace and Quorum for the County of Penobscot" ....."In Feb 1792 he issued a warrant to Capt. James Budge, calling a meeting of the inhabitants to organize the town of Bangor. In the year 1800 he was appointed postmaster at Eddyton Plantation, a post route having been established there...

After a long and eventful life Col. Eddy died Aug 1804, aged 78."
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