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Military Quotes

There is no type of human endeavor where it is so important that the leader understands all phases of his job as that of the profession of arms.

-- Major General James Fry

The Army Ordnance Song

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Army Ordnance Arsenal Day, June 10, 1941, served a double function: it honored the 40,000 workers in the various arsenals, and it introduced to a nationwide audience Irving Berlin's new Army Ordnance song, "Arms for the Love of America."

Major General C. M. Wesson, Chief of Ordnance, had designated June 10 as Arsenal Day to commemorate the traditional role of the ordnance arsenals as the cornerstone of armament productions since post-Revolutionary War days. The program was broadcast by the National Broadcasting Company and the Columbia Broadcasting System over coast-to-coast networks from 9:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

The soloist was Barry Wood, accompanied by the Lynn Murray Singers and the Army Band.

Berlin composed "Arms for the Love of America," a rollicking, snappy march, for General Wesson at the request of Lieutenant Colonel John B. Bellinger, executive assistant to the Chief of Ordnance. Lieutenant Colonel Bellinger suggested that the song symbolize the need for production and at the same time serve an inspirational purpose in defense industries.

All profits from the sale of copies by the publishers were donated to Army charitable and relief purposes.

On land and on the sea and in the air

We've got to be there, We've got to be there.

America is sounding her alarms

We've got to have arms, We've got to have arms.

Arms for the love of America

They speak in a foreign land, with weapons in every hand.

What ever they try we've got to reply in language they understand.

Arms for the love of America

And for the love of every mother's son

Who's depending on the work that must be done

By the man, behind the man, behind the gun

They're in the camps and in the training schools

Now give them the tools, they've got to have tools.

We called them from the factories and farms

Now give them the arms, They've got to have arms.

Arms for the love of America.

We've got to get in the race, and work at a lively pace.

They say over here we've nothing to fear but let's get ready just in case.

Arms for the love of America.

And for the love of every mother's son.

Oh the fight for freedom can be lost or won

By the man, behind the man, behind the gun.
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This Day in History
1779: 300 Continental Marines attacked the British at Fort George, Penobscot Bay.

1812: The USS Constitution escapes from a British squadron after a three day chase off New Jersey.

1862: Nathan Bedford Forrest made his first raid.

1862: A Naval court martial meeting in Richmond acquitted Flag Officer Tattnall with honor for ordering the destruction of the C.S.S. Virginia on 11 May after the evacuation of Norfolk.

1863: Confederate General John Hunt Morgan's raid on the North is dealt a serious blow when a large part of his force is captured as they try to escape across the Ohio River at Buffington Island, Ohio.

1863: After seeking to intercept the troops of General Morgan for some 10 days and 500 miles, the gun-boat squadron under Lieutenant Commander Fitch engaged the Confederate raiders as they attempted to effect a crossing of the Ohio River at Buffington Island. The U.S.S. Moose and steamer Alleghany Belle repeatedly frustrated the Southerners' attempts to cross.

1886: Atlanta, the first steel-hulled American cruiser armed with breechloading rifled guns, is commissioned.

1918: French and Americans advance on Soissons-Thierry line, taking Vierzy (north of Ourcq) and Neuilly St. Front (south of Ourcq).

1918: The U.S. armoured cruiser "San Diego" sunk off Fire Island, off New York, with six lost.

1940: President Roosevelt signs the "Two-Ocean Navy Expansion Act." This orders construction of 1,325,000 tons of warships and 15,000 naval planes. Including the existing ships, the fleet will comprise 35 battleships, 20 carriers and 88 cruisers.