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A bold general may be lucky, but no general can be lucky unless he is bold.

-- Field Marshal Archibald Percival Wavell

German missiles of WW2

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During World War II, Germany developed many missile systems, some of which were extremely advanced.

These included the first cruise missile, the first short range ballistic missile, the first guided surface-to-air missiles, and the first anti-ship missiles.

List of missiles


Surface-to-surface missiles
Both the V1 and V2 were used operationally, against London and other targets. The Rheinbote was fired against Antwerp.

V1 flying bomb
V2 rocket
Rheinbote


Surface-to-air missiles
Germany developed a number of surface-to-air missile systems, none of which were ever used operationally:

Enzian
Rheintochter (an air-to-air variant was also planned)
Wasserfall missile
Schmetterling (an air-to-air variant was also planned)
Bachem Ba 349 "Natter" (a manned rocket which would be launched vertically and which in turn would shoot down enemy aircraft with a battery of smaller rockets)


Air-to-air missiles
X-4 missile (anti-tank variants of this were also designed, such as the X-7 and X-10)
R4M rocket


Anti-ship missiles
German anti-ship missiles were used operationally against allied shipping in 1943, notably in the Mediterranean Sea:

Fritz X anti-ship missile
Henschel Hs 293 air-to-ship gliding guided bomb
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