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Arctic naval convoys

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Achkasov, V.I. and N.B. Pavlovich. Soviet Naval Operations in the Great Patriotic War, 1941-1945. Annapolis MD: Naval Institute Press, 1981. [See ch.9, "Defense of Our Own Maritime Communications."].

Browning, Robert M., Jr. US. Merchant Vessel War Casualties of World War II. Annapolis MD: Naval Institute Press, 1996. [contains information on the actions and fate of each ship's Armed Guard detachment].

Campbell, Ian. The Kola Run: A Record of Arctic Convoys, 1941-1945. London: Muller, 1958

Carse, Robert. A Cold Corner of Hell: The Story of Murmansk Convoys, 1941-45. Garden City NY: Doubleday, 1969.

Edwards, Bernard. The Road to Russia: Arctic Convoys 1942. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2002.

Evans, Mark Llewellyn. Great World War II Battles in the Arctic. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1999.

Irving, David John Cawdell. The Destruction of Convoy PQ.17. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1968.

Kaplan, Philip. Convoy: Merchant Sailors at War, 1939-1945. Annapolis MD: Naval Institute Press, 1998. [See "Run to the Red Star.," pp.136-151.].

Kemp, Paul. The Russian Convoys, 1941-1945. London: Arms and Armor, 1987.

Moore, Arthur R. A Careless Word -- A Needless Sinking: A History of the Staggering Losses Suffered by the U.S. Merchant Marine, Both in Ships and Personnel During World War II. Kings Point NY: American Merchant Marine Museum, 1988. [Although this work contains useful information on each vessel lost, Robert Browning's book (see above) contains significantly more information on the actions and fate of each ship's Armed Guard detachment.]

Morison, Samuel Eliot. The Atlantic Battle Won, May 1943 - May 1945. vol.10 of History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Boston: Little Brown, 1956. [See ch.13, "In Arctic Waters, May - December 1943," pp. 229-244; and ch.16, "In Arctic Waters, 1944 - 1945," pp.305-316.].

____. The Battle of the Atlantic, September 1939 - May 1943. vol.1 of History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Boston: Little Brown, 1947. [See ch.7, "The North Atlantic Run, December 1941 - July 1942," pp. 158-192; and ch.14, "Ten Months Incessant Battle, July 1942 - April 1943," pp. 358-375.].

Pope, Dudley. 73 North: The Defeat of Hitler's Navy. New York: J.B. Lippincott, 1958.

Roskill, S.W. The Defensive. vol.1 of The War at Sea, 1939-1945. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1954. [see ch.22, "Home Waters and the Arctic, 1st June - 31st December, 1941," pp.483-496.].

____. The Offensive, Part I, 1st June 1943 - 31st May 1944. vol.3 of The War at Sea, 1939-1945. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1960. [See ch. 4, "Home Waters and the Arctic, 1st June - 31st December 1943," pp.57-89; and ch.10, "Home Waters and the Arctic, 1st January - 31st May 1944," pp. 267-282.].

____ The Period of Balance. vol.2 of The War at Sea, 1939-1945. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1956. [See ch.5, "Home Waters and the Arctic, 1st January - 31st July 1942," pp.115-146; ch.12, "Home Waters and the Arctic, 1st August - 31st December 1942," pp. 277-299; and ch.16, "Home Waters and the Arctic," 1st January - 31st May 1943," pp.397-403."].

Ruegg, Bob and Arnold Hague. Convoys to Russia: Allied Convoys and Naval Surface Operations in Arctic Waters 1941-1945. Kendal, England: World Ship Society, 1992. [While not focused on the Armed Guard, this useful volume contains a brief narrative history of each convoy, as well as a list of participating merchant ships, information on warships escorting each convoy, and ship losses.].

Schofield, Brian Betham. The Russian Convoys. Philadelphia PA: Dufour Editions, 1964.

Taylor, Theodore. Battle in the Arctic Seas: The Story of Convoy PQ 17. New York: Crowell, 1976.

Woodman, Richard. The Arctic Convoys 1941-1945. London: John Murray, 1994.

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