Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Lieutenant Commander John W. Harvey, USN, (1927-1963)

(201 total words in this text)
(1441 Reads)  Printer-friendly page
John Wesley Harvey was born in the Bronx, New York, on 4 September 1927. He attended public schools in Philadelphia and studied at the University of Pennsylvania briefly before entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1946. After graduation as a member of the Class of 1950, Ensign Harvey served for a year in the aircraft carrier Coral Sea (CVB-43), then was sent to Submarine School. He served in USS Sea Robin (SS-407) in 1952-53, then spent two years receiving instruction in nuclear power.

In July 1955, Lieutenant Harvey joined the pioneer nuclear submarine USS Nautilus (SSN-571). In 1958 he was assigned as Chief Engineer of the land-based S1C prototype nuclear powerplant, then was Engineer in the nuclear submarine Tullibee (SSN-597) and Executive Officer of USS Seadragon (SSN-584). While serving in Nautilus and Seadragon, he participated in under-ice voyages to the North Pole.

Lieutenant Commander Harvey took command of the nuclear-powered attack submarine Thresher (SSN-593) in January 1963, while she was in the shipyard for overhaul. He took his "boat" to sea for the first time for post-overhaul trials. On 10 April 1963, Lieutenant Commander John W. Harvey lost his life when Thresher accidently sank during diving tests.

Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Has military leadership done enough to protect our troops in post war Iraq?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 158

This Day in History
1863: The Battle of Chancellorsville ends when Union Army retreats.

1864: The Army of the Potomac embarks on the biggest campaign of the Civil War and crosses the Rapidan River, precipitating an epic showdown that eventually decides the war.

1942: The Battle of the Coral Sea commences.

1951: The U.S. Senate unanimously passed a bill to raise the maximum strength of the Marine Corps to 400,000 -- double its strength at the time. The bill also made the Commandant of the Marine Corps a consultant to the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

1961: Secretary of State Dean Rusk reports that Viet Cong forces have grown to 12,000 men and that they had killed or kidnapped more than 3,000 persons in 1960. While declaring that the United States would supply South Vietnam with any possible help, he refused to say whether the United States would intervene militarily.