Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size
Login

Military Photos



Sitting Bull

(250 total words in this text)
(1084 Reads)  Printer-friendly page
Sitting Bull (Sioux: Tatanka Iyotake or Tatanka Iyotanka orTa-Tanka I-Yotank, born Hunkesni, Slow), (c. 1831 ? December 15, 1890) was a Native American shaman and leader of the Hunkpapa Sioux, who led 3,500 Sioux and Cheyenne warriors against the US 7th Cavalry under George Armstrong Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn on June 25, 1876. Though he did not participate personally in the battle, the chiefs were spurred on by a dream that Sitting Bull had in which a group of American soldiers tumbled into his encampment.

Blamed for the ensuing massacre, Sitting Bull led his tribe into Canada, where they lived until 1881, when on July 20 he led the last of his fugitive people in surrender to United States troops at Fort Buford in Montana. The US government, however, had granted him amnesty.

In later life, Sitting Bull toured with Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, where he was a popular attraction. Often asked to address the audience, he frequently cursed them in his native Lakota language to the wild applause of his listeners.

Toward the end of his life, Sitting Bull was drawn to the mystical Ghost Dance as a way of repelling the white invaders from his people's land. Although he himself was not a follower, this was perceived as a threat by the American government, and a group of Indian police was sent to arrest him. In the ensuing scuffle, Sitting Bull and his son Crow Foot were killed.

Military History
Forum Posts

Military Polls

Should the proposed Global War on Terrorism Medal be issued?

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 52

This Day in History
1692: The Massacre of Glencoe takes place when thirty-eight members of the MacDonald clan are murdered by soldiers of the neighboring Campbell clan for not pledging allegiance to William of Orange.

1861: The earliest military action to be revered with a Medal of Honor award is performed by Colonel Bernard J.D. Irwin, an assistant army surgeon serving in the first major U.S.-Apache conflict.

1862: The four day Battle of Fort Donelson, Tennessee, begins.

1865: The Confederacy approves the recruitment of slaves as soldiers, as long as the approval of their owners is gained.

1943: The U.S. Marine Corps Womens Reserve was formed.

1945: A series of Allied firebombing raids begins against the German city of Dresden, reducing the city to rubble and flames, and killing as many as 135,000 people. It was the single most destructive bombing of the war.

1945: The first naval units enter Manila Bay since 1942.

1951: At the Battle of Chipyong-ni, in Korea, U.N. troops contain the Chinese forces offensive in a two-day battle.

1965: President Lyndon B. Johnson approves Operation Rolling Thunder, the sustained bombing of North Vietnam that he and his advisers had been contemplating for a year.

1968: As an emergency measure in response to the 1968 communist Tet Offensive, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara approves the deployment of 10,500 troops to cope with threats of a second offensive.