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If our soldiers are not overburdened with money, it is not because they have a distaste for riches; if their lives are not unduly long, it is not because they are disinclined to longevity.

-- Sun Tzu

World War II will try and tell you a little about us taking Turkey. We landed all right, but got a warm reception and a good general salute from their shrapnel and machine guns. The 3rd brigade were the first to land, at 2 a.m. They landed under a splendid covering force from our warships; the Turks all the time pouring in shrapnel and machine-gun fire.


As soon as they landed they charged up the first ridge (100 feet), and drove the Turks back to the second ridge, and held that till we landed. Then we charged and drove the Turks to the flat country. We took up a position on the third ridge, which we held till nightfall. All the afternoon the Turks were trying to make flank attacks, but the warships blocked that on the left, and the Indians on the right. We entrenched at night on this ridge, and waited for our artillery to land.

All day long we were fighting against great odds - our rifle fire against their machine guns and artillery. Their shrapnel played havoc with our men all day, knocking them over like dolls. I got hit with a piece of shrapnel on the shoulder, and had to retire from the field. I was hit at night, and was taken on board the Clan McGillivray, and sent to Alexandria, and as there was no room there we were sent to Malta. On board the "Clan" they gave us the best treatment they could. There were only two doctors on board, and we were living on tinned beef and biscuits. We got no bread till we got to Alexandria, but we are all right now.

We are living in barracks now, 12 to a room, and beds to sleep on. This is a fine place, and everyone is good to us. All our uniforms are torn and dirty, so we can't go out much. I was wounded in the middle of the shoulder. The bullet went through to the left arm, and travelled through 15 inches of flesh. The doctor took the bullet out yesterday. I will keep it and bring it home for a keepsake. I have all the Egyptian coins and a few other little keepsakes in my pack-bag, and that was left on the field. I may not get it back again.
Note:
Writing from Malta, under date of 4th May, Private H. G. Clarke, of Footscray, a member of the Scottish Regiment at the front.


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