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On the Perimeter8591 Reads  Printer-friendly page

Gulf War One of the things you have to watch out for in the field are tracks. Tracks of any kind can put a real damper on your day when they come rolling across your site without warning. To avoid such confrontations we took special care to build deep and well fortified fighting positions when time allowed.

Being in a signal unit we usually did have time to build nice positions aside from the hasties dug in convoy every time the enemy decided to throw some crap our way.

I think the best position I ever built was at our second site. Everyone really went all out as it was a mere 4 clicks off the border and we knew we were in much more serious danger then we had been before and it was probably going to be the last time we would have the opportunity to feel safe even in this small fashion. The position my team made was wonderful. Not only did it have 4 view ports and special platforms for my 60 it had all the things anyone could want in a fighting position but never has time to make such as g pits, sand bag fortification, and a tarp woven into the top to stop the rain.

One night sitting out there after my partner in the hole had fallen fast asleep it started to rain. As it rained it stated to fog up. In between wiping the condensation off of my nvg and trying to get a good look down range an occasional lightning burst would allow me some actual vision. about a half hour after these basically zero visibility conditions started I noticed a dark form a ways out ahead moving towards my position very slowly and deliberately. A couple more lightning flashes and I was sure this was a person rather then an animal. I immediately locked and loaded my 60, pat checked my AT4's and chemical gear, then brought my M16 close to the 60 in case we would need to bail out. A couple more lightning flashes and the person was less then 20 yards from my position and now I could clearly see it was a soldier. My trigger finger tightened as I considered the options of lighting this guy up verses the possibility that there were many more like him out there I did not want to alert to the position of a machine gun.

I did a radio check a couple holes over to see if anyone else had seen what I had but the visibility was so bad I alone at this point had any kind of view and shot at this person. a couple more lightning flashed and I see he is now moving in to what appeared to be a prone fighting position. Another flash and I notice something odd. He has stopped mid way into his decent and is now removing gear. I had no idea what to think of this and keep the barrel of the 60 aimed squarely on his torso. It was not until the guy started to reverse his actions that it dawned on me what he was doing. This guy has stumbled around in the dark to find a place to crap and had ended up less then twenty yards in front of my position without a clue I was there.

We all had a great laugh when the next day we visited the tracks a couple hills over, were he had come from, to tell him he had almost died taking that crap.

Note: by David Bailey, A Company, 13th Signal Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division


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Hi David I Almost shot a Camel in the Dark Like That
by Brando
on Oct 23, 2009

This is your friend ex-Spc Richard Brando, A Co 13th Signal Bn 1st Cav circa Desert Shield/Storm. Hiya, yeah remember that huge site my node center was set up out in the deep dunes on that hilltop during the Desert Shield phase? I was perched with my radiorig hummer and generator and 3 antenae on a pretty large mountain in the middle of dunes in all directions. We were providing Comm for a large Bradley group below our hill. It was tight, Tac-Sat and all meant calls home. But anyways I was in my foxhole in the middle of the night on the outside portion of my rig site, and Saudi gets all dew soden and misty in the night. So I see this shadow in the shape of a man standing. Im calling halt etc and I have my M16 trained on it. It shifts a little and I am getting hot yelling at it and charging my M16. Then I get a view thru the mist and its a freaking camel wandering up on my mountain. Almost a dead camel. What trouble I wouldve had if I had put it down too, :-)


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