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Should the U.S. use a Draft to Alleviate Military Recruiting Problems?

Yes52 %52 %52 % 52.63 % (50)
No17 %17 %17 % 17.89 % (17)
Only in times of war26 %26 %26 % 26.32 % (25)
No opinion1 %1 %1 % 1.05 % (1)
Other, please list in comments2 %2 %2 % 2.11 % (2)

Total votes: 95
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Should the U.S. use a Draft to Alleviate Military Recrui
by Anonymous
on Mar 03, 2002
I believe in full time, mandatory, military service for every US citizen, male and female, consisting of two years, immediately after High School. Conscientiuos objectors could be assigned to non-combat duty. I realize this is extreme, but today's conditions are extreme. If a person accepts the benefits of being a citizen of this country, He/She should be willing to work and fight for it. It would have the added benefit of bringing a more mature group to the colleges.
Just an old man's opinion

Re: Should the U.S. use a Draft to Alleviate Military Recrui
by Anonymous
on Mar 03, 2002
I agree. In addition to supporting the country it makes the draftee a better person. Without exception when I interview people for positions in my firm, I look to see if they have military experience. They generally are a lot more reliable.

Bill


Re: Should the U.S. use a Draft to Alleviate Military Recrui
by Anonymous
on Apr 11, 2002
Everyone is having the same shortfalls in "recruiting," both military and civilian -- because we have been killing our population growth and taxpayer base for the last 25 years thru abortion.
Men between 22-30 should go through basic training and be in the Reserves for least 5 years during that time. Optional for women of same ages.

Re: Should the U.S. use a Draft to Alleviate Military Recrui
by Anonymous
on Jun 04, 2002

All citizens of the United States should serve in some capacity in the government. Freedom is not free. A lot of Americans would appreciate what we have if they had to work for it. To sacrifice a few years is not that much, besides most people who serve in the military do not even see combat.


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Should we be continuing to close U.S. military bases in light of current conflicts?

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