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Should the military services require enlisted experience before becoming a commissioned officer?

Yes63 %63 %63 % 63.58 % (96)
No35 %35 %35 % 35.10 % (53)
I do not know0 %0 %0 % 0.66 % (1)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.00 % (0)
Other, please list in comments0 %0 %0 % 0.66 % (1)

Total votes: 151
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Should the military services require enlisted experience
by Anonymous
on Nov 16, 2002

Find out what it takes to do the job and decide whether you are prepared to lead the job in getting done and if you can be depended on to be a true leader. Then you just might have what it takes to direct and get the job done. Then and only then you might deserve to get a salute. Sir!


Re: Should the military services require enlisted experience
by Anonymous
on Nov 17, 2002
I don't know if the experience should come BEFORE earning a commission, but do believe all officers AND all enlisted at EVERY rank should switch jobs (and insignia somehow, or revert to the slick) once yearly for half a month or so...that'd pretty well get everybody
"in touch with themselves" in a big hurry. It ain't much fun being an officer either at times. What I really could envision is that future officers be required to have attended highschool ROTC or a military school, for some sort of extra credit or entrance requirement at OCS or an academy...and something similar for enlisted. What used to drive us all nuts was the "90 day Wonders". Academy grads at least had to do something significant to survive their schooling, not least of which was to be in really subservient positions to upperclassmen (for years!). But battle, thats a whole different elephant...so ideally what I hope mostly for is a tenacious street-smart no BS NCO and a commander with heart as well as brains who listens to them, all the time. However, any officer who had come up through the ranks from enlisted or even WO grades sort of had more respect automatically. I came across more NCOs I would've had trouble following than officers though...thats just what happened.
Bluehawk

Re: Should the military services require enlisted experience
by Gimpy
on Nov 18, 2002
The worst jerks among the officers I met were OCS officers. And, they had been enlisted. The best officers I worked with were West Point and other military academy graduates. I think if you are going to be a jerk you'll be a jerk regardless of previous service. I think the four years of a military academy makes them realize the plight of the enlisted man. Some of the ROTC officers didn't have a clue about the military, but generally were nice guys. It was the OCS guys that most of us didn't care for, and that ruins the idea that they need to have some time in as an enlisted person.

Keith

Re: Should the military services require enlisted experience
by Anonymous
on Dec 01, 2002

This is like asking if a staff sargeant should have a degree. I think leadership doesn't require knowledge of the masses or books. I've seen many enlisted officers who abused their power and were ignorant of legalities. They definitely needed more book smarts. Commissioned officers paid different dues. Both deserve the respect due them.


Re: Should the military services require enlisted experience
by Anonymous
on Jan 14, 2006

I have served now for 30 years and my new commander is the same age as my oldest child. They have no idea of military life!


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