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In war there is but one favorable moment; the great art is to seize it!

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Current poll results


Should lawmakers pass the new military tax relief bill in Congress?

Yes83 %83 %83 % 83.93 % (141)
No11 %11 %11 % 11.31 % (19)
I do not know0 %0 %0 % 0.00 % (0)
I have no opinion2 %2 %2 % 2.98 % (5)
Other, please list in comments1 %1 %1 % 1.79 % (3)

Total votes: 168
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Should lawmakers pass the new military tax relief bill i
by David
on May 04, 2003
The legislation, providing almost $1 billion in tax relief over 10 years, would allow military reservists and National Guard personnel to deduct their service-related travel expenses, whether they itemize or not. It would also fully exempt from taxes the $6,000 in death benefits paid to military survivors; only part of the amount is now exempt.

In addition, capital gains tax rules would be modified for home sales by service members to reflect their frequent transfers around the country and world. They often do not live in a home for at least two out of five years before it is sold, which is the current requirement for a capital gains exemption in most cases.

Other provisions would clarify that current child care tax breaks apply to those provided by the military and extend tax filing deadlines for personnel involved in certain operations.

To pay the costs of the tax breaks, the bill would impose an immediate capital gains tax on property sales above $600,000 for people who relinquish their U.S. citizenship. Current law allows those taxes to be spread over a 10-year period.


Re: Should lawmakers pass the new military tax relief bill i
by Anonymous
on May 10, 2003
Absolutely they should pass that legislation, and every other thing they can possibly enact that will support the people our government sends to do unsavory lonely and often violent deadly work in our name. They must also see to it that the Vets Administration either gets ALL the funding it needs to do everything and anything it has promised to do, or gets off its butt immediately to expedite what HAS been funded!
Bluehawk

Re: Should lawmakers pass the new military tax relief bill i
by Anonymous
on May 15, 2003

vet and active duty personel deserve real help and benifits not phoney stuff that a politician will point to and say see I did this to support the vets and then say we complain to much.Rember in the 70's the Viet Nam vet were cry babies when we brought up agent ornge ,post tramaitc,and judicall review.As usual we were right, we "earned" better treatment.


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