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Should the proposed Global War on Terrorism Medal be issued?

Yes64 %64 %64 % 64.41 % (38)
No25 %25 %25 % 25.42 % (15)
I do not know3 %3 %3 % 3.39 % (2)
I have no opinion3 %3 %3 % 3.39 % (2)
Other, please list in comments3 %3 %3 % 3.39 % (2)

Total votes: 59
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Should the proposed Global War on Terrorism Medal be iss
by Anonymous
on Mar 08, 2004

It should not be handed out to all members of the service. Just those units that deployed or were stationed in that part of the world. And then only to the members that were there.


Re: Should the proposed Global War on Terrorism Medal be iss
by Anonymous
on Mar 08, 2004
I kinda go along with Sparrowhawk on this one... for one thing, it is rather unseemly to issue a medal for a war that has not yet been fully fought because it has been declared in advance to be practically endless.... and HAS been going on a long long long time already (e.g. Beirut and Marine barracks etc etc etc). So, by rights, every one who has served ever since terrorism got started ON or WITH the U.S.A. oughta be considered for the medal, IF it is going to become one like the so-called "Cold War" medal which (if memory serves) cannot be worn amongst one's fruit salad anyhow.

Taking, however, from the VN example, there oughta then be one version for in-theatre operations, and one for they who were signed on during the duration... whenever somebody figures out (at least) when, exacraly, it began.

I'd just as soon see the medals be reserved for those who served, in the two ways listed above, during the various campaigns by name... e.g. Beirut, Somalia, Balkans, Iraq I, Iraq II, Afghanistan and, I myself would include, Colombia.

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