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Military Quotes

Everything which the enemy least expects will succeed the best.

-- Frederick II of Prussia

Current poll results


Should active duty military members speech be censored in public?

Yes50 %50 %50 % 50.24 % (103)
No42 %42 %42 % 42.93 % (88)
I do not know2 %2 %2 % 2.44 % (5)
I have no opinion1 %1 %1 % 1.95 % (4)
Other, please list in comments2 %2 %2 % 2.44 % (5)

Total votes: 205
One vote is allowed per day

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Comments

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Re: Should active duty military members speech be censored i
by Anonymous
on Sep 21, 2004

If the content of the speech is of a personal opinion and does not reflect the official policy of the US government, then the speech should be done in civilian mufti and not in uniform, since the wearing of a uniform gives the impression that the speaker, and his views, are representing the Executive Branch of the government.


Re: Should active duty military members speech be censored i
by
on Sep 30, 2004

Active Duty folks need to remember their Oath at all times.


Re: Should active duty military members speech be censored i
by Anonymous
on Oct 08, 2004

Military Members may state their opinion OUT of uniform as just Their opinion! BUT, In Uniform they must remember the UCMJ and follow the guidlines set for them and refer all official statements to the apropriate Base authority or face disiplinary actions so accorded.


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Military History
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Should Military Members be Allowed to Sue the Military?

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This Day in History
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