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Should people born outside of the U.S. have a right to run for President?

Yes4 %4 %4 % 4.20 % (6)
No90 %90 %90 % 90.91 % (130)
I do not know3 %3 %3 % 3.50 % (5)
I have no opinion0 %0 %0 % 0.70 % (1)
Other, please list in comments0 %0 %0 % 0.70 % (1)

Total votes: 143
One vote is allowed per day

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Re: Should people born outside of the U.S. have a right to r
by GoldenDragon
on Dec 07, 2004
Commander-in-chief born in America?
Sure, that would be a major consideration but essential and required for candidacy? No.
If the person has proven his or her devotion to freedom and liberty of America and to it?s people then they should be allowed to run for the office and let the electorate make the decision if they are the best choice.
Under today?s law the current Governor of California is not qualified to run for the highest office in the land but the citizens of California thought that he was qualified enough to run that left coast state.
Should someone who left a land that was committed and diametrically opposed to the American way of democracy be able to run for office? If that person showed they had not forsaken their old countries ways, advocated that America change the way it governs it?s people and championed their previous countries way of governing then the American people are wise enough to make a wise decision at the poles. We have not elected a Communist Party candidate yet and I do not believe that we will in my lifetime but the American Communist Party is still able to enter a candidate. Now, is that stupid or not?
I personally don?t believe that someone who has publicly spoken out against America and the American way of defending its freedoms should be President, but I?ll decide that at the poles and they have every rite to waste their time and money in running for office. If they have spoken out against our armed forces during a time of war, and made that redirect in front of the enemy then I think that they should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and are guilty of ?high crimes and misdemeanors? and therefore disqualified from running for public office. If they are native born Americans then they should be prosecuted in the American judicial system. If they are not native born Americans then they should be deported.
Americans are ninety-nine and forty-four one hundreds percent not stupid and therefore capable of making wise decisions no matter where that decision was born.

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