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Go forward until the last round is fired and the last drop of gas is expended...then go forward on foot!

-- General George Patton Jr

Flags of Our Fathers

"Flags of Our Fathers" is a combined biography of six men who raised the Stars and Strips on top Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima. Five Marines and one Navy Corpsman. Today, the names of John Bradley (USN), Rene Gagnon (USMC), Harlon Block (USMC), Franklin Sousley (USMC), Mike Strank (USMC), Ira Hayes (USMC) were the "flagraisers" from right to left. Three were killed later during the battle. Three, by Presidential order, were pulled from the battle. "The Flags of Our Fathers" tells the reader about the different backgrounds of the six men from birth to their decision to enter the military. For Strank, Hayes, and Harlon Block were combat veterans, for the other three, Iwo Jima would be their first taste of combat. The book covers the training the the newly formed 5th Marine Division. The story covers the "flagraisers" combat experiences on Iwo Jima. "Flag of Our Fathers" covers the raising of the "first" flag, and why the small "first" flag was replaced by the "second" flag, which the famous "Raising the flag on Mt. Suribachi. James Bradley, son to John Bradley, recounts the story of Frank Rosenthal shooting the second raising; the myths about the event, and the misunderstandings of the flag raising event. The book continues with the 7th bond tour, in which the "flagraiser" were a part of. Mr. Bradley chronicals the lives of the remaining three until their deaths. John Bradley was the last to pass away in 1994. It was not tell the Bradley family was going through John's effects that James discovered the Navy Cross his father earned on Iwo, artifacts from the bond tour, and other memorablia from WWII. At that point James Bradley decided to discover why his father never talked his experience in the war or the flagraising event, and why his father never thought the event was that important. I personally recommend this book to you. It is the best account of my average Americans fought World War II, and how they reacted to peace. Two had troubled lives. One was going to make a decent living, take care of his family, and serve his community.


Added:  Saturday, September 04, 2004
Reviewer:  usmcsgt65
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hits: 5236
Language: eng

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This Day in History
1835: Inspired by the spirited leadership of Benjamin Rush Milam, the newly created Texan Army takes possession of the city of San Antonio, an important victory for the Republic of Texas in its war for independence from Mexico.

1861: To monitor both military progress and the Lincoln administration, Congress creates the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War.

1863: Major General John G. Foster replaces Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside as Commander of the Department of Ohio.

1916: Bulgarian troops cross the Danube near Silistria and Tutrakan, capturing towns on the left bank.

1938: Prototype shipboard radar is installed on the USS New York.

1940: Two British divisions, half of them composed of Indian troops, attack seven Italian divisions in Egypt. Overwhelmed, the Italian position in Egypt collapsed.

1941: The USS Swordfish (SS-193) makes the first U.S. submarine attack on a Japanese ship.

1950: X Corps was forced to withdraw from Hungnam by sea. A curtain of intense naval gunfire greatly aided the successful evacuation of 3,834 U.N. military personnel, 1,146 vehicles, 10,013 tons of bulk cargo and 7,000 Korean civilian refugees by elements of the U.S. Navy's Task Force 90.

1952: Three carriers of Task Force 77 launched aircraft to strike military targets at Munsan, Hyesanjin, Rashin and Hunyun, the latter being the northernmost air raid on the Korean War.

1992: U.S. Marines land in Somalia to ensure food and medicine reaches the deprived areas of that country.