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Military Quotes

Do your damnedest in an ostentatious manner all the time.

-- General George Patton Jr

Flags of Our Fathers

"Flags of Our Fathers" is a combined biography of six men who raised the Stars and Strips on top Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima. Five Marines and one Navy Corpsman. Today, the names of John Bradley (USN), Rene Gagnon (USMC), Harlon Block (USMC), Franklin Sousley (USMC), Mike Strank (USMC), Ira Hayes (USMC) were the "flagraisers" from right to left. Three were killed later during the battle. Three, by Presidential order, were pulled from the battle. "The Flags of Our Fathers" tells the reader about the different backgrounds of the six men from birth to their decision to enter the military. For Strank, Hayes, and Harlon Block were combat veterans, for the other three, Iwo Jima would be their first taste of combat. The book covers the training the the newly formed 5th Marine Division. The story covers the "flagraisers" combat experiences on Iwo Jima. "Flag of Our Fathers" covers the raising of the "first" flag, and why the small "first" flag was replaced by the "second" flag, which the famous "Raising the flag on Mt. Suribachi. James Bradley, son to John Bradley, recounts the story of Frank Rosenthal shooting the second raising; the myths about the event, and the misunderstandings of the flag raising event. The book continues with the 7th bond tour, in which the "flagraiser" were a part of. Mr. Bradley chronicals the lives of the remaining three until their deaths. John Bradley was the last to pass away in 1994. It was not tell the Bradley family was going through John's effects that James discovered the Navy Cross his father earned on Iwo, artifacts from the bond tour, and other memorablia from WWII. At that point James Bradley decided to discover why his father never talked his experience in the war or the flagraising event, and why his father never thought the event was that important. I personally recommend this book to you. It is the best account of my average Americans fought World War II, and how they reacted to peace. Two had troubled lives. One was going to make a decent living, take care of his family, and serve his community.


Added:  Saturday, September 04, 2004
Reviewer:  usmcsgt65
Score:
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Language: eng

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This Day in History
1863: Confederate General John Bell Hood is officially removed as commander of the Army of Tennessee.

1870: Declaring he did not care whether or not it was the rebellious band of Indians he had been searching for, Colonel Eugene Baker orders his men to attack a sleeping camp of peaceful Blackfeet along the Marias River in northern Montana.

1941: Charles A. Lindbergh, a national hero since his nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic, testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on the Lend-Lease policy-and suggests that the United States negotiate a neutrality pact with Hitler. He eventually contributed to the war effort, though, flying 50 combat missions over the Pacific.

1949: The Communist Chinese forces begin their advance on Nanking.

1951: Thirty-three F-84s of the U.S. Air Forces 27th Fighter-Escort Wing engaged 30 MiG-15s in a dogfight over the skies of Sinuiju. In less than a minute Captains Allen McGuire and William Slaughter each destroyed a MiG while First Lieutenant Jacob Kratt scored two kills, the first double MiG kill of the war.

1951: U.S. First Marine Division elements attacked guerrilla concentrations in the vicinity of Andong.

1953: The U.S. Air Forces 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing flew the last F-51 Mustang mission of the war.

1968: The USS Pueblo is attacked and seized by four North Korean torpedo boats, a N. Korean sub chaser ship and two Mig jets. The Pueblo is 15.8 miles off Wonsan, N. Korea, and in International waters. No American planes are scrambled from South Korea and except through diplomatic efforts, no attempt is made to recover the ship or its crew. One crew member is killed as a result of the attack and the crew is held in captivity for eleven months before being released.

1973: President Richard Nixon claims that Vietnam peace has been reached in Paris and that the POWs would be home in 60 days.

1986: The U.S. begins maneuvers off the Libyan coast.